Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Lubaina Himid: Someone told me black people don’t make art

Lubaina Himid won the Turner Prize in 2017 (Edmund Blok/Hull UK City of Cult)
Lubaina Himid won the Turner Prize in 2017 (Edmund Blok/Hull UK City of Cult)

Turner Prize-winning artist Lubaina Himid was told “black people don’t make art” before her career success.

In 2017 Himid became the first black woman to win the Turner Prize and the oldest recipient of the award.

She has said these firsts were “bittersweet” but gave people hope that the UK art world was becoming more diverse.

Himid has said that early in her career the art establishment considered the idea of black artists “alien”, and one person told her they did not make art at all.

Lauren Laverne and Lubaina Himid
Himid spoke on Desert Island Discs (BBC Radio 4)

The artist, born in Zanzibar, spoke to Lauren Laverne on BBC Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs.

She said: “We were not on the television, we were not in the newspapers, unless something drastic and dangerous happened.

“I guess the notion of black people being artists was completely alien to people in the British art world.

“Someone actually said to me ‘black people don’t make art’.”

Himid’s work has concentrated on black identity, and issues of slavery.

In 2017 she won the £25,000 Turner Prize, marking a first for black female artists.

Turner Prize 2017
Lubaina Himid with one of her works of art titled A Fashionable Marriage (Danny Lawson/PA)

She said: “Being the first black woman was a bit bittersweet, because there are many black women that have been up for it in the recent history of the prize.

“I was happy to win it, but it was bittersweet.

“What people have said to me is that it gave people hope that things were changing.”

Himid hopes these changes can be built upon in order to make the art world, and the rest of society, a fairer place.

She said: “I do think things are changing.

“The important thing is that we need to keep building on these changes. We have to keep vigilant, and just make sure everything is fair.”

The full interview can be heard on BBC Sounds and BBC Radio 4, Sunday at 11.15am.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]