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Christine And The Queens: Being queer glossed out as super-fancy accessory

Heloise Letissier aka Christine And The Queens (Ian West/PA)
Heloise Letissier aka Christine And The Queens (Ian West/PA)

Christine And The Queens has revealed she has mixed feelings about singers like Taylor Swift filling music videos with LGBTQ+ stars because “being queer has been glossed out as this super-fancy accessory”.

The music video for Swift’s You Need to Calm Down featured some prominent queer celebrities, which some critics suggested was opportunistic.

Christine And The Queens on Cosmopolitan
Christine And The Queens on Cosmopolitan (Cosmopolitan UK / Matthew Eades)

French singer Christine told Cosmopolitan magazine: “I’m conflicted. I guess somewhere, young gay men might watch that Taylor Swift video and feel a sense of relief.

“Five years on (since she entered the industry) and you can tell that being queer has been glossed out as this super-fancy accessory. You can tell that the queer aesthetic is being used to sell things.

“The mainstream needs that life because it’s so vibrant. But I think the core of the queer aesthetic cannot be sold.”

The singer also discussed coming out as pansexual – meaning people who can be attracted to others regardless of their gender identity or biological sex – to the French media in 2014.

Christine And The Queens in Cosmopolitan
Christine And The Queens in Cosmopolitan (Cosmopolitan UK / Matthew Eades)

“It was like a detonation,” she said.

“When your sexuality is not the norm, you have to find words to express it.

“Sometimes I was made to feel dirty, or like it was obscene. It’s just a sexual orientation – there’s nothing perverse about that.

“Just being young, sexually active and proud of your sexuality is a problem for women. You’re a ‘slut’, so you’re shamed…”

The 31-year-old – whose real name is Heloise Letissier – added: “’Christine’ was born out of feeling frustrated that people would say no to me because I was a woman. She was this anger.

“Christine was a fantasy of escaping that.” 

The full interview is in the November issue of Cosmopolitan, which is on sale on October 2.

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