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The Tiger Who Came To Tea to be adapted for TV

Judith Kerr (John Stillwell/PA)
Judith Kerr (John Stillwell/PA)

Much-loved children’s book The Tiger Who Came To Tea is being adapted for the small screen.

Channel 4 has announced it will be airing a special animated adaptation of Judith Kerr’s story.

The hand-drawn special, from the makers of We’re Going On A Bear Hunt, will be broadcast this Christmas.

The Tiger Who Came To Tea has sold more than five million copies since it was first published in 1968.

Judith Kerr, author of the Tiger Who Came to Tea, during a reading
Judith Kerr, author of the Tiger Who Came To Tea, during a reading (Gareth Fuller/PA)

It tells the story of a tea-guzzling tiger, who turns up unannounced and eats and drinks Sophie and her mother out of house and home.

Kerr, 95, is also the author of the Mog books as well as When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, a version of her childhood experiences of fleeing the Nazis.

Kerr recently received an Oldie Of The Year award and told the audience how the book about the greedy tiger came to fruition.

“The Tiger Who Came To Tea is a story I made up for my two-year-old daughter, who was very bossy,” she said.

“I used to tell her all sorts of other stories as well, which I thought were perfectly good, which she dismissed with the words ‘Talk the Tiger’.

“So when she and her brother were both at school I thought I’d try to make it into a picture book.”

Ruth Fielding, producer and co-founder of Lupus Films, said: “We are delighted to be creating a new animated film for Channel 4 using our unique hand-drawn style.

“This timeless tale, with huge cross-generational appeal, is the perfect literary classic to adapt for a seasonal special when the whole family can come together to watch it.

“We cannot wait to bring Judith’s delightful illustrations to life in animation and have assembled an exceptional team to do so”.

Chloe Tucker, commissioning executive of Channel 4 drama, said: “We are delighted to bring Judith Kerr’s iconic and much-loved children’s book to our screens.

“The Tiger Who Came to Tea is a timeless classic, and we hope this film will capture the same special place in every family’s imagination watching it.”

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