Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Ian McMillan: Let the news be read in a northern accent

Ian McMillan said the North is now central to the news agenda (John Giles/PA)
Ian McMillan said the North is now central to the news agenda (John Giles/PA)

Barnsley poet Ian McMillan has urged broadcasters to employ newsreaders who speak with a northern accent.

Writing in the Radio Times, he said that although the North is now central to the news agenda, people from the area “can’t be trusted with t’autocue”.

He added that while TV commissioners understand the importance of representing the North in drama they are hesitant to employ people with northern accents to read the news.

He said: “Seismic and nuanced shifts in political culture are happening at the top end of England and this historic earth tremor will be rattling the pots on the sideboard for years to come.”

McMillan added that “the North is a ventriloquist’s dummy and the South is in control of the speaking mouth”.

“Newsreaders from the North aren’t reading the news about themselves because, well, there aren’t any,” he said.

“And there haven’t been since the sainted Wilfred Pickles, unmistakably from Halifax, last read a bulletin on the Home Service during the Second World War.”

The full interview is in this week’s Radio Times (Radio Times/PA)

The poet said that people from the North should not just be limited to appearing on local broadcasts.

“So come on, people in charge: let a northern voice read the news, and not just the news about the North,” he said.

“Let’s pervade the airwaves like bindweed on an allotment.”

He added that the lack of northern voices on the news is nothing new.

McMillan said: “This isn’t a new phenomenon, of course, the idea that the flat vowel equals a flat cap equals a flattening of gravitas, and that in the words of the late, great Scottish writer Tom Leonard, the news can’t be read by ‘wanna yoo scruff’.”

Read the full interview in this week’s Radio Times.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]