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Carbon is an emerging and developing market to be encouraged, according to P&J Business Breakfast speaker Don Macleod

Don Macleod is speaker at P&J business breakfast
Don Macleod is speaker at P&J business breakfast

Carbon is a developing market across the Scottish landscape, with huge potential for businesses, investors and land specialists.

This will be one of the topics discussed at The Press and Journal Business Breakfast, in association with Turcan Connell, from 8-9am on Friday September 24.

Adding his expertise to the discussion will be Don Macleod, partner for land and property at professional services firm Turcan Connell.

Mr Macleod acts for a number of significant landed estates throughout Scotland and a number of forestry investors, both private wealth and institutional.

He is also heavily involved in advising on the legal aspects of carbon contracts. This gives him a unique insight into the trends facing investors and landowners alike.

Market that’s constantly evolving

The carbon purchase market in Scotland is becoming more sophisticated”, Mr Macleod said.

He added: “It’s an emerging and developing market that’s gone from a relatively low gear in 2019 to a pretty high gear by 2021 and lots of potential for future growth.

“We are giving lots of advice in relation to carbon contracts. They are developing very quickly and the market is becoming more sophisticated.

It’s an emerging and developing market that’s gone from a relatively low gear in 2019 to a pretty high gear by 2021 and lots of potential for future growth.”

“People are thinking about tree planting and the risk and rewards.”

Mr Macleod has seen increased activity from businesses based in the north and north-east.

He said: “There’s lots of activity there in terms of existing forestry or some farms that are being given up to forestry use, rather than traditional farming.

“That’s definitely a bit of a theme.”

Huge money-making potential from carbon

Mr Macleod believes there is money to be made from carbon, particularly through planting trees or restoring peat bogs.

He added: “That is the best way to go about it and there’s two angles on this.

“Businesses or individuals who want to make money out of this do it by buying land and peat bogs, planting trees and selling the carbon – that’s one angle.

“Then you’ve got the other angle where businesses genuinely want to be careful about the off-setting, so they want to do a deal with somebody to get trees.”

Private investment to play its part

The Scottish Government has set out ambitious plans to establish around 7,400-12,350 acres per year of new native woodland in order to meet net-zero targets.

For Mr Macleod, this is achievable under the right circumstances.

He added: “Private investment, planting new trees and restoring peat bogs is all key to it.”

Joining Mr Macleod on the panel of speakers for the not-to-be-missed event on September 24 is David Robertson, investment and business development director for Scottish Woodlands.

Scottish Woodlands is a leading forestry management company, with a long tradition of serving forest owners and investors in Scotland and the rest of the UK.

Mr Robertson works daily with professional advisors, agents and a variety of other partners to find, place and secure a range of forestry and land subjects on behalf of private, corporate and institutional clients.

Each of the speakers will deliver a presentation and then answer questions from their virtual audience.

To register for the breakfast event for free, visit www.pandjbreakfast.co.uk

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