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Aberdeen firm AEL follows singing cowboy’s advice and goes down Mexico way as part of global expansion plans

AEL (Aberdeen) chairman Graeme Mackie, left, with Lord Provost Barney Crockett.
AEL (Aberdeen) chairman Graeme Mackie, left, with Lord Provost Barney Crockett.

AEL (Aberdeen), an electrical equipment supplier for the global energy industry, has grown its overseas footprint by launching a business in Mexico.

And plans are rapidly taking shape to further expand the 40-year-old company’s reach into other new markets, with Scandinavia among areas currently in AEL’s sights.

From its global headquarters in Bridge of Don and regional hubs in Houston, in the US, and Baku, Azerbaijan, AEL supplies a broad range of electrical products and services to the onshore, offshore, renewable energy, petrochemical, marine and industrial sectors.

AEL’s reach in the global market has gone from strength to strength, but it is evident that Aberdeen is still very much at the heart of their operation.”

Barney Crockett, Aberdeen Lord Provost

The increased international focus is partly down to the contribution to the family-owned business of joint managing director of Alan Mackie, who is also president of Houston-based AEL Americas.

He spends a lot of his time working on developing new opportunities across the Atlantic.

AEL insisted its new business south of the US border – “down Mexico way” to quote a famous song by “singing cowboy” Gene Autry – and any future moves to expand overseas will not be to the detriment of operations in the company’s own back yard.

Celebrating four decades in Aberdeen

The firm’s chairman and its other joint MD is Graeme Mackie, Alan’s father, who stressed efforts to seize opportunities closer to home, the company’s Aberdeen roots and creating employment opportunities in the north-east would always be important.

Mr Mackie Snr added: “For 40 years the Aberdeen market has supported our growth and it continues to be a critical part of operations every day.

“Aberdeen is still the hub of operations and the city is our corporate home.

Nurturing talent

“As we continue to explore new markets, whilst strengthening our foothold in traditional ones, having the right people on board for the journey is very important.

“We have seen first-hand the benefit of harnessing and nurturing local talent, and this is something we seek to achieve wherever in the world we operate.”

AEL said its new trading business and office in Cordoba, in the Mexican state of Veracruz, were the most recent moves towards revenues becoming equally balanced between domestic and overseas markets.

The firm, founded in 1981, cited a “unique mix” of geographic spread and the continuity created by 100% family ownership as key factors in its “enduring success”.

Aberdeen is still the hub of operations and the city is our corporate home.”

Graeme Mackie, AEL (Aberdeen)

AEL currently employs more than 35 people and turnover is in the region of £8 million. As well as focusing on recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic and overseas growth, the company hopes to continue expanding its product lines at home and internationally.

Aberdeen Lord Provost Barney Crockett recently congratulated AEL on its 40th anniversary during a visit to its headquarters.

Mr Crockett said: “I was delighted to join Graeme on this very special occasion. AEL’s reach in the global market has gone from strength to strength, but it is evident that Aberdeen is still very much at the heart of their operation.”


AEL eyes growth in UK and US

 

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