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James Bream takes on new role at DYW North East

James Bream, who has been unveiled as the new chairman of DYW North East.

Developing the Young Workforce (DYW) North East has a new chairman, with leading Aberdeen businessman James Bream taking over the role from former EY partner Alec Carstairs.

Mr Bream, 43, will now lead the DYW North East’s drive to connect businesses and schools.

He will also help to steer the organisation as it embarks on one of the most significant periods of activity in its history.

I want DYW North East to be the most successful group of its kind in Scotland.”

James Bream.

The longstanding goal is to engage, inspire and develop the region’s future workforce.

Over the past 10 months the organisation has expanded considerably to offer enhanced on-the-ground support to all 32 secondary schools across Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire.

Mr Bream, general manager of Granite City-based Katoni Engineering, has a strong track record for growing and managing businesses through change.

He already boasts extensive knowledge of DYW North East and its work.

He was both a director of DYW North East and research and policy director with Aberdeen and Grampian Chamber of Commerce from 2013-2015.

P&J columnist

Mr Bream has a keen interest in economics and is a regular commentator in the press, including as a columnist in The Press and Journal.

His regular articles in the P&J are focused mainly on the north-east economy and energy industry.

“I’m extremely proud to be chair of DYW North East and follow Alec Carstairs, who has mentored me in the past,” he said, adding: “We have a fantastic and passionate board, coupled with a brilliant team, and I want DYW North East to be the most successful group of its kind in Scotland.

“Being the best in the country will rely on businesses in this area to commit to showing we care about our young people.

“I’m confident they will step up and demonstrate that we can lead the way in Scotland.”

‘Our employers look after their own’

Mr Bream continued: “I’m personally committed to playing my part, whether that is through efforts at Katoni Engineering or visiting our region’s largest employers.

“I want to show the rest of Scotland that as well as being global player our employers look after their own.”

His appointment follows the addition of three new faces to the DYW North East board in August.

Clan Cancer Support chief executive Colette Backwell, Neil McKinnon of Peterson Offshore Group and Anita Martin of Well-Safe Solutions have recently joined the organisation, augmenting its experience and breadth of expertise.

Clan Cancer Support chief executive Colette Backwell.

DYW North East director Mary Holland said: “I am delighted to welcome James to his new position as chair.

“He joins us during a particularly important phase in our history.

“While there is no mistaking that this is a very challenging time for young people, there are also significant opportunities in this region that we need to make them aware of and prepare them for.”

DYW North East director Mary Holland.

Ms Holland added: “The strategic vision and expertise of our board, coupled with our extended team of employer school coordinators, means we are better placed than ever to develop sustained and impactful connections between industry and education.

“These connections are vital, both for our young people and for our region’s future economic success.”

DYW is the Scottish Government’s youth employment strategy to better prepare young people for the world of work.

Activities are delivered by 21 regional groups, of which DYW North East is one.

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