Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Nuclear contamination tests continue in north of Scotland

Dounreay
Dounreay

More nuclear tests are set to be carried out for contamination on beaches in the Far North.

Additional sampling has been recommended of beaches near the Dounreay nuclear power site to help in the detection of radioactive particles.

Sand-sized fragments of irradiated nuclear fuel were flushed into the sea from the site in the 1960s and 1970s.

Hundreds of the fragments have been found and removed from beaches over the years.

Fragments of irradiated nuclear fuel were first detected on the Dounreay site coastal strip in 1983 and on the beach at Sandside in 1984.

Dounreay in Caithness was the centre of the UK fast breeder reactor research programme from 1954 until 1994.

Some 180 facilities, including three reactors, chemical reprocessing plants and various waste facilities, were built on approximately 136 acres. It is being decommissioned at a cost of £1.6bn.

The continuation and addition of more beach sampling work has been recommended in a new report.

The report by Scottish Environment Protection Agency (Sepa) said monitoring for particles on the foreshore and also at Sandside Beach, which has been done for many years, should continue for the foreseeable future.

But Sepa said equipment used to detect the fragments should be upgraded to improve detection rates, and also to better find more deeply buried particles.

Work to recover particles from the seabed was done between the 1990s and 2012

The agency has further recommended the taking of more samples than taken previously and that monitoring be done in May and again six months later at Strathy Point and Murkle Beach.

In the report, Sepa said work done since the 1990s to 2012 to recover particles from the seabed appeared to have successfully reduced “depleted” the number of particles that came to rest there.

Sepa said the monitoring of the beaches would help to confirm if that was the case.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]