Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Aberdeen University study offers volunteers free breakfasts to find out more about weight loss

Prof Alexandra Johnstone (left) and Dr Leonie Ruddick-Collins.
Prof Alexandra Johnstone (left) and Dr Leonie Ruddick-Collins.

Free breakfasts are being given to volunteers taking part in a new study to find out if eating more food earlier in the day can help you lose weight.

Scientists are testing the theory that people should start their morning with the heaviest meal of the day to help them stay healthy.

Aberdeen University’s Rowett Institute will be launching the new research project with the participants involved required to eat a strict diet over 10 weeks.

Volunteers will spend the first five weeks enjoying large breakfasts with smaller evening meals before finishing off the study reversing the process.

Professor Alex Johnstone, who is part of the team behind the project, said she hopes the data gathered could be used to inform policy makers, food producers, healthcare providers and others to create healthier attitudes to meal times.

She said: “We’re trying to find out more about how the time you eat your meals influences your metabolism and weight loss.

“Everyone taking part gets their food provided for free from our kitchens, they can come down and collect their meals three times a week and then on some days they will have tests to conduct as well.

“And of course it’s a weight loss study, so there’s the benefit that all of the volunteers will lose weight.

“Our hypothesis is that a bigger breakfast will have a greater impact on physiology, and could help people to lose more weight, because other work has suggested that.”

The research team hope to recruit 30 volunteers for the project, which will run for the rest of the year and into early 2019.

They will measure the impact of changing meal times by monitoring volunteers recording their metabolism after eating with a special hood that analyses breath.

Prof Johnstone added: “This work could be very far reaching, as a lot of people are really interested in how nutrition can have an impact on health.”

The study is open to overweight men and women over the age of 18 who usually eat breakfast at least five days a week.

Any women who wish to take part must be on a hormonal contraceptive.

To sign up, call 01224 438700.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]