Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Sweet victory! Pupil power gets promise of puddings back on the school menu

A pupil campaign to “Save our Puddings” in Aberdeenshire has been victorious – with council chiefs promising desserts for all.

Earlier this year, Aberdeenshire Council cut many of its sweet options on health grounds.

The move sparked outrage among pupils, who launched a campaign to bring back ice cream and custard.

The crunch issue was debated today in council chambers – and student leaders were told that they can expect some low-sugar desserts to make a comeback soon.

William Dibb, 11, addressed the Aberdeenshire Council education and children’s services committee Thursday morning.

William delivered an eloquent request to put puddings back on school menus.

“After losing touch with our friends, our schools and our freedoms, we were now to lose our puddings too.”

– William Dibb, 11

When the cuts were made in the Spring, petitioners called the move a “very strict interpretation” of new government nutritional guidelines.

William impressed the councillors with his confidence and depth of research on the topic.

His reward was a promise from catering officials that new recipes of low-sugar desserts will be back on the menu in October.

‘Save the puddings’

In his address to the council, William said that, although he has now started S1 at the Gordon Schools, he is still furthering the interests of his primary colleagues.

“In the Spring, my class was very disappointed when we found out that our primary school menus would be changed to remove custard, ice creams and many of the baked treats which we enjoy to eat after our lunches.”

 

William Dibb (right) and Angus Beverly (left), who helped kickstart a petition to put desserts back on primary school menus. DCTMEDIA/JASON HEDGES

 

 

“We were told that this was due to the food and drink in schools regulations issued by the Scottish Government.”

William said that the new changes struck a chord with his classmates. They found out about the menu changes immediately after returning from a difficult lockdown period.

“Let us all have a healthy and balanced menu which we can all enjoy. Please?”

-William Dibb, 11

With a host of new Covid-19 precautions and rules to follow, the loss of the simple pleasure of desserts was more difficult.

“After losing touch with our friends, our schools and our freedoms, we were now to lose our puddings too.”

A healthy, balanced menu – please!

While he understands the council needs to comply with regulations to reduce sugar, William said that there should be room for a compromise.

“Everything should be in moderation. Burgers with salad. Hot dogs with cucumber. Fruit with ice cream.

“Let us all have a healthy and balanced menu which we can all enjoy. Please?”

Councillors wowed by ‘eloquent, compelling’ pupils

William, fellow campaigner Angus Beverly and their classmates gathered almost 850 signatures from pupils and staff.

He presented the council with information on what desserts are available in other council areas, where sugar cutbacks were not so severe.

Director of education and children’s services Laurence Findlay thanked William for a “confident, eloquent and compelling” presentation and offered good news.

I am glad to say that we will be putting custard back on the menu in our October menus.

-Catering Officer Ian Paterson

Mr Findlay reported that the council will release a full report on the catering services in October. Catering officer Ian Paterson said that he appreciated the pupil feedback. He also provided some background on why the menus changed in the first place.

“The average consumption for pupils at the moment should be 24g of sugar, which is equivalent to five cubes of sugar.

“The actual consumption is 13 sugar cubes, which is 65g of sugar. That’s why the changes had to be made.”

‘Save the puddings’ sparks action

“But we have been working behind the scenes,” Mr Paterson added, giving hope to the petitioners.

“We couldn’t just go with reduced sugar options, we had to make sure that they were trialled so we didn’t lose the quality that we had.”

The result: a new spread of low-sugar dessert options. Mr Paterson said the campaign to save the puddings was the driving force for the change.

“Mainly because of this petition, we looked at that point specifically. I am glad to say that we will be putting custard back on the menu in our October menus.

“That is a good and positive outcome.”

More from the Schools & Family team

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]