Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Head to Orkney to commemorate the centenary of the Battle of Jutland

Poppies: Weeping Window is from the installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red – poppies and original concept by artist Paul Cummins and installation designed by Tom Piper – by Paul Cummins Ceramics in conjunction with Historic Royal Palaces. The installation was originally at the Tower of London in 2014.
Poppies: Weeping Window is from the installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red – poppies and original concept by artist Paul Cummins and installation designed by Tom Piper – by Paul Cummins Ceramics in conjunction with Historic Royal Palaces. The installation was originally at the Tower of London in 2014.

Thousands of ceramic poppies are to go on display at Orkney’s iconic St Magnus Cathedral as part of plans to commemorate the centenary of the Battle of Jutland.

Orkney will host the UK’s national commemoration of the Battle of Jutland this year with a series of events planned across the islands.

A spokesman for Orkney Tourism Group said: “Orkney played a crucial role in both world wars and those conflicts have left their mark on the islands, both physically and emotionally.

“We’re very proud that Orkney will this year find itself at the centre of the Battle of Jutland centenary commemorations and it’s a great honour to learn that we have also been chosen as a host for the incredibly poignant and iconic poppy sculpture. We’re sure it will have special resonance for everyone in the islands and deeply move all those who visit us during this period of remembrance and reflection.”

Poppies: Weeping Window is from the installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red – poppies and original concept by artist Paul Cummins and installation designed by Tom Piper – by Paul Cummins Ceramics in conjunction with Historic Royal Palaces. The installation was originally at the Tower of London in 2014.

yw-pops

Culture Secretary John Whittingdale said: “A wide-ranging cultural programme will help to ensure that every citizen across the UK will be able to reflect on the events of 100 years ago and honour those who made such huge sacrifices.

“These artistic works will complement the commemorative events this year to mark the centenaries of the Battles of Jutland and the Somme. I am especially pleased that we are bringing the iconic Weeping Window poppies sculpture to Orkney as a poignant tribute to the many men who served during the Battle of Jutland and the wider war at sea.”

Jenny Waldman, director of 14-18 NOW, the UK’s official arts programme for the World War I centenary, said: “We are delighted to be able to bring Poppies: Weeping Window to Orkney. This is the farthest the poppies have travelled and it presents a wonderful opportunity for even more people to experience these iconic sculptures.”

Jutland was the most significant naval engagement of World War I, with more than 100,000 sailors involved on 250 ships. More than 6,000 Royal Navy and 2,500 German sailors lost their lives.

The commemorative events include a morning service on Tuesday, May 31, at St Magnus Cathedral, followed by a ceremony and time for reflection at the Lyness Royal Naval Cemetery in Hoy, where more than 400 Commonwealth servicemen and German sailors from World War I – some as young as 16 – are buried.

During the course of the following week, a full commemorative programme of events will take place across Orkney, This will culminate on Sunday, June 5, with an event to commemorate the loss of 737 men, including Secretary of State for War Lord Kitchener, when HMS Hampshire was sunk by a mine west of Orkney off Marwick Head.

Two sculptures, Wave and Weeping Window, which together have more than 10,000 poppies, have been saved for the nation by the Backstage Trust and the Clore Duffield Foundation, and gifted to 14-18 NOW and Imperial War Museums. Thousands of ceramic poppies will make up the installation at St Magnus Cathedral.

Poppies: Weeping Window will see the poppies cascade from the western end of St Magnus Cathedral in Kirkwall, Orkney, between Friday, April 22, and Sunday, June 12. If you want to visit Orkney during the commemorative events, contact www.visitorkney.com for information and advice.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]