Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Tartan Noir stalwarts Ian Rankin and Val McDermid among contenders for coveted crime prize

Ian Rankin is among the contenders for a coveted crime writing prize.
Ian Rankin is among the contenders for a coveted crime writing prize.

Renowned Scottish writers Ian Rankin and Val McDermid are among the contenders to win this year’s most coveted prize in crime fiction.

The Fife duo, along with Irvine-born Doug Johnstone, have been selected in a longlist of 18 for the annual Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year.

The award, which is now in its 17th year, features an eclectic book selection, capable of transporting readers around the world from California to Sweden and Calcutta to a remote Irish island, while the different works explore every subgenre from Scandi noir to murderous families.

The line-up of returning champions is led by Cardenden-born Rankin, who has received the nod for his highly-acclaimed A Song for The Dark Times, Mark Billingham, who is hoping for a third win with his Cry Baby, and Steve Cavanagh who is aspiring to beat the competition with Fifty Fifty.

However, the roll call of contenders also features a number of authors who have never previously been in the running for the prize. These include Lucy Foley, Chris Whitaker, Liz Nugent, Jane Casey and Johnstone.

Ian Rankin’s Inspector Rebus was turned into a popular TV show

The list is also littered with several previously nominated authors hoping to go one step further and clinch the trophy, including Elly Griffiths for The Lantern Men, Susie Steiner for Remain Silent, Brian McGilloway’s for The Last Crossing, and Louise Candlish with The Other Passenger.

Joining these names is the ‘Queen of Crime’ herself, Val McDermid with her newest Karen Pirie novel Still Life.

As somebody who is celebrated in the industry for her impeccable ability to select emerging talent for the annual New Blood panel at Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival, the Raith Rovers aficionado finds herself competing against many New Blood alumni including Will Dean, Eva Dolan, Abir Mukherjee and Trevor Wood.

Val McDermid, who is appearing at Granite Noir, has started a new quintet of novels.

The full longlist is: Cry Baby by Mark Billingham, The Other Passenger by Louise Candlish, The Cutting Place by Jane Casey, Fifty Fifty by Steve Cavanagh, Black River by Will Dean, Between Two Evils by Eva Dolan, The Guest List by Lucy Foley, The Lantern Men by Elly Griffiths, The Big Chill by Doug Johnstone, Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton, Still Life by Val McDermid, The Last Crossing by Brian McGilloway, Death in the East by Abir Mukherjee, Our Little Cruelties by Liz Nugent, A Song For The Dark Times by Ian Rankin, Remain Silent by Susie Steiner, We Begin At The End by Chris Whitaker and The Man on the Street by Trevor Wood.

Run by Harrogate International Festivals, the shortlist will be announced in June and the winner unveiled on July 22 at the opening evening of the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival – with the public able to vote for the winner at: harrogatetheakstoncrimeaward.com

 

 

 

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]