Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Sensible shoes: Comfortable footwear kicks heels out of fashion

Robyn shoes in pewter, £65, Hotter.
Robyn shoes in pewter, £65, Hotter.

Sensible shoes. It’s not a phrase to send pulses racing, but it does send shoppers to the checkouts.

While heels may look nice, they can play havoc with the feet and spine as weight is shifted onto the ball of the foot and toes. The result can be bunions, hammer toes and even a shortened Achilles tendon.

Latest research by Mintel reported a 27% footwear sales growth worldwide in 2020, worth £3.6billion, driven by comfort wear including slippers, which are now the second most purchased type of women’s footwear.

It’s true that 2020 was a year like no other for retail and so it is no surprise that Mintel also reported a decline in the formal footwear market.

However, the desire for comfortable shoes was a trend long before the move to homeworking.


Our top picks:

Glossi loafers, £85, Dune London.
Goldfinch loafers, £85, Dune London.
Ashley, £89.95, Barbour.
Lola’s Tea Room Suede Shoes, £59, Joe Browns.
Preppy And Perfect Shoes, £45, Joe Browns.
Gallerie leopard loafers, £65, Dune London.
Grange red loafers, £75, Dune London.
Glides leopard, £85, Dune London.
Black Patent Loafer, £18, Tu.

Hotter Shoes, which specialises in “customised comfort and precision fit” is now the UK’s biggest footwear manufacturer, selling more than 1.3 million pairs of shoes a year and growing.

During the pandemic, its sales of casual shoes nearly doubled, but even as lockdowns have lifted, the trend has continued with sales of active and outdoor shoes jumping up by 65% in July 2021 compared to July 2019.

Thanks to the likes of Hotter, Dune, M&S and others, shoes can look good and still be comfortable.

Victoria Betts, chief commercial officer at Hotter, said: “Customers want to look and feel fantastic in their footwear. Flat, comfortable shoes or loafers can absolutely be styled up for an evening out but similarly they can be worn for casual walks with friends too.”


Read More…

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]