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Just Eat reveals UK’s ‘sweetest spots’ and the treats customers in Aberdeen and Inverness can’t resist

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The “sweetest spots” across the country have been revealed, with Aberdonians loving their ice cream and Inverness folk rather partial to a slush.

Just Eat has analysed millions of dessert and sweet takeaway orders across the UK to discover the “sweetest spots” of the country.

To bring the data to life, Just Eat has created an interactive map that allows you to compare cities all over the UK to discover who has the sweetest palate across the country and drill down to what their favourite dishes are.

Aberdeen ranks 50th overall on the UK’s sweet chart. The most popular takeaway ordered there are: 1 Ice Cream; 2 Slush; 3 Milkshake.

Inverness is among the areas that order the least amount of sweet dishes. It ranks 110th overall on the UK’s sweet chart, with the most popular takeaways ordered there being: 1 Waffle; 2 Slush; 3 Brownie.

Waffles are a popular order.

Takeaway delivery app service Just Eat discovered the nation’s most popular sweet order is milkshakes, followed by chocolate chip cookie dough and chocolate fudge cake.

The most original orders came from Enfield and Durham with rainbow cake among their top orders and also from Plymouth where vegan coffee shakes were at the top of their most wanted sweet treats list.

North London with milkshakes, Liverpool where the favourite is cookie dough and West London (milkshakes) were the places with the most sweet orders in the UK.

Motherwell tops in Scotland

In Scotland, Motherwell, where the favourite is slush, has the largest number of sweet orders with the Lanarkshire town coming in at number 10 on the UK list.

Overall on the Scottish list, Kirkcaldy was third, Dundee fourth, Perth seventh and Aberdeen ninth.

The data was gathered by analysing more than 700 million sweet orders from bakeries, ice cream shops, coffee shops and desserts from all restaurant menus.

To adjust for population size, the data was then processed per capita to understand the true density of sweet dishes per location.

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