Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Boost in home sales across Scotland… Apart from in Aberdeen

Figures show property transactions in Scotland rose 24% on the previous year in January
Figures show property transactions in Scotland rose 24% on the previous year in January

Scotland has experienced the highest volume of home sales for January since 2008 in what experts described as a “bracing” start to the year.

Property transactions were up 24% on the previous year – outpacing sales south of the border as England and Wales only saw a 1% rise over the same period.

The average Scottish house price also went up to £171,079 – a rise of 0.8% on the month before.

January’s increase marked the sixth consecutive month of year-on-year growth in house prices, the latest Your Move/Acadata Scotland house price index reveals.

Over the three months from November to January, all local authority areas saw an increase in housing transactions apart from Aberdeen city and Aberdeenshire, where sales numbers fell by 11% and 3% respectively.

The two areas also saw a decline in average house prices compared to 2015.

Christine Campbell, Your Move managing director in Scotland, said: “The surge in Scottish home purchases has been propelled by second-home and buy-to-let buyers eager to avoid paying the 3% Land and Buildings Transaction Tax (LBTT) surcharge.

“As this tax hike was only announced in December’s Scottish Budget, January’s surge in sales may only be the tip of the iceberg.”

House prices in Edinburgh remained the highest, with the average being £244,132, but the area that saw the biggest increase for the second month in a row was Stirling.

The purchase price in the city rose by £13,920 in January to £205,875.

John Tindale, senior housing analyst for Acadata, said: “This increase was assisted by the sale of two high-value detached homes in January (with both properties being sold at prices in excess of £1 million).

“These homes are both located in secluded countryside, and may well have been an example of sales being brought forward into January to avoid paying the 3% LBTT surcharge on second homes that comes into force in April 2016.”

Property sales in Midlothian outperformed every other area, shooting up 38% over the three months from November compared to the same period a year ago, with flats and terraced house sales accounting for the largest rise.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]