The country house where Captain Scott planned his ill-fated final expedition – and it could be yours for offers over £550,000

Burnside Lodge in Glen Prosen, by Kirriemuir, is on the market at offers over £550,000
Burnside Lodge in Glen Prosen, by Kirriemuir, is on the market at offers over £550,000

If walls could talk, then those inside Burnside Lodge in Glen Prosen, by Kirriemuir, would have a fascinating story to tell.

For it was here in 1910 and 1911 that Captain Robert Falcon Scott and his fellow explorer Dr Edward Adrian Wilson spent months planning their epic exhibition to the South Pole. They reached the South Pole on January 17 1912 – and died together on the Great Ice Barrier the following March.

At the time of their planning meetings, the house was owned by their friend, the publisher of books by local author JM Barrie (Peter Pan).

The house, which played an important role in British history, is on the market at offers over £550,000, and still has fascinating items of memorabilia relating to their stay, while the bedrooms bear the names of expedition members.

Ruaraidh Ogilvie, of selling agent Savills, said: “Burnside Lodge has a fascinating history and a beautiful location – and the added claim to fame of having appeared in the film Scott Of The Antarctic starring John Mills in 1948.

“These factors make it a particularly attractive prospect for a tourism business, although its current layout would also lend itself very well to extended family living or a shared holiday home.”

Burnside Lodge was originally a stone-built estate cottage and was extended in the early 1900s in the Edwardian lodge style, with timber panelling and a cedar tiled roof. The house was extended again in the 1970s and has been considerably refurbished by the current owners over the last decade or so to include a new kitchen and conservatory.

It is close to the small village of Dykehead at the foot of Glen Clova and Glen Prosen, two of the most picturesque of the Angus Glens, which reach deep into the Grampian mountains. The house itself is surrounded by established gardens with features including a paved terrace that leads down to flower and shrub borders, lawn and a small pond.

A sheltered gravelled seating area has a poignant memorial sundial dedicated to Dr Wilson, Pioneer Polar Explorer and Man of Faith. This was designed by Bruce Walker, who was also commissioned to create the new memorial at Scott’s View and was responsible for two etched windows in the sitting room of Burnside Lodge.

In addition, there are hedges and trees, a summer house and raised decking adjacent to the conservatory. Behind the outbuildings is an area of woodland with some fine rhododendrons, fruit trees and a hen run – all enclosed by deer fencing.

The house is divisible into two self-contained sections, front and back, giving plenty of flexibility for a new owner to either restore it to one complete house, to use it for dual-generational independent but side-by-side living, or use one part of the house for B&B or as a holiday let.

In total, there are three reception rooms, a study/library, snug, a kitchen in both sections of the house (one with an Aga), two bathrooms, a shower room and five bedrooms, four of which are wood-lined and feature the names of the Antarctic expedition members on the doors: Scott, Bowers, Wilson and Evans.

To the rear of the house is a store housing a standby generator. There are further stores, a cellar, greenhouse, garage, workshop and several wooden outbuildings and sheds.

Contact Savills on 01356 628628.

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