Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

My First Car: 1935 Austin saloon

Spence with his1935 Austin.
Spence with his1935 Austin.

My first car was four years older than me!

It was a 1935 Austin 10 h.p. saloon which I bought from my late father-in-law in 1961.

He always said that it didn’t matter how old a car was “if it was a good one”, and he had in fact bought it to replace a late 40’s Ford which was developing problems.

The old Austin had a slight connection to Aberdeen Journals. My father-in-law, Harry Munro, was employed by the Journals for many years as a van driver, and was later angling correspondent writing a weekly column.

Austin 10 Litchfield saloon car, built in 1935, being driven at a classic vehicle show.

He had bought the car from a photographer who worked for the Journals. When I parted with the car I sold it to a mechanic who worked in the Aberdeen Journals garage.

The Austin was the first car I drove solo after passing my test. One day, my father- in-law bravely offered to lend it to me to go on an errand in town.

He always said that it didn’t matter how old a car was “if it was a good one”

I still remember how, for the first time, I felt relaxed and confident behind the wheel, and my enjoyment of driving began during that short journey.

In the A-Z of Cars of the 1930’s, Classic and Sports Car series of books, the authors describe the Austin 10 as “very, very reliable”.

The Austin review: “very, very reliable”.

I certainly don’t remember having any major problems with it during the year or so that I owned it. The bodywork, in dark blue and black, was in excellent condition.

The engine was reasonably quiet, and there were no little vibration noises from the interior trim or the solid wood fascia, which enclosed a speedometer and a clock which still kept good time.

In cold weather the two female passengers would sit in the back seats with travelling rugs and, on occasions, hot water bottles

The clutch was gentle and forgiving, which made the car very easy to drive; even a complete novice would be hard pushed to produce the “kangaroo petrol” effect.

One thing the car lacked was a heater. At weekends we sometimes took a couple of friends for a trip to the country, and in cold weather the two female passengers would sit in the back seats with travelling rugs and, on occasions, hot water bottles!

Car park attraction

At that time my wife and I were living in a small, top floor flat in Castle Street, overlooking the Castlegate.

There was nowhere to keep the car except for the public car park nearby. It certainly stood out from the crowd, and I quite often saw passers-by stopping to have a closer look at it.

I think I glimpsed a light-coloured example of the same model in a recent episode of All Creatures Great and Small on Channel 5, which reminded me of my early motoring days.

  • Spence Rae is a Press and Journal reader.

We want your first car stories: why you bought it, what you loved about it, what you disliked, its finest features and your best moments with it (or worst!).

Whatever you want to share we’ll be happy to see.

Just email yourcar@ajl.co.uk with your name, location, any details you can remember about your car: make, model, year and cost, plus any pics you still have.

We look forward to seeing your car memories.

 

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]