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The day I interviewed Sir Roger Moore

Sir Roger Moore
Sir Roger Moore

It’s not everyday you get the chance to interview one of Hollywood’s finest stars, and especially one you looked forward to watching on the telly as a child.

The Saint, starring heartthrob Roger Moore in his pre-Sir days, was compulsive viewing for those of use who grew up in the 1960s.

My father, Bill Morrison, had met the actor while he was with the Royal Engineers working in Cyprus.

He was filming a Bond film there, and much to my dad’s delight, accepted an offer to join the other officers for a drink that night in the NAAAFI.

For years, he told me that Sir Roger was hugely personable, down to earth and great fun.

Having been lucky enough to interview Sir Roger, in advance of a visit to Aberdeen last year, I can only agree, but add to that list of qualities self-deprecation, wit and a tremendous sense of loyalty.

While he chatted at length, open, honestly and with great humour about his one-time fondness for gambling and playing James Bond, he became deadly serious when speaking about the men and women of the Armed Forces.

A former soldier himself, he was horrified at FIFA’s ban to stop players wearing poppies during an international football match taking place on Armistice Day.

Referring to it as a “thundering disgrace” he said he slept easy in his bed at night because of the boys in blue, green and blue.

Today, they will no doubt salute him.

Tonight, I’ll raise a glass to the memory of an actor who never let fame go to his head, appreciated life, and who regularly put a smile on the faces of people around the world.

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