Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Councillors dismiss concerns about £40,000 scheme to teach seven kids Gaelic

The most frequent targets of physical assaults in both council regions were education professionals.
The most frequent targets of physical assaults in both council regions were education professionals.

North-east councillors have dismissed concerns that education chiefs in Aberdeenshire have spent close to £40,000 a year sending seven pupils to the city to study Gaelic.

The figures emerged in a report to the education committee which met in Aberdeenshire yesterday.

Last year, £37,570 was spent on taking the pupils to Gilcomston School in the city for Gaelic medium education (GME), where primary aged children are taught the curriculum in the traditional language.

Council spends £40k a year sending seven pupils for Gaelic lessons

Education bosses estimate the transportation costs for the pupils – who are from Portlethen, Stonehaven and Inverurie – will stretch to £39,000 for the current school year.

Last week Scottish language entertainer and broadcaster Robert Lovie said he hopes Doric – the north-east’s “Mither Tongue” – will receive similar financial backing.

But during yesterday’s education meeting at Woodhill House, Labour councillor Alison Evison, the council’s former co-leader, insisted funding Gaelic tuition was a worthwhile investment.

She said: “If you look at what’s paid, it’s very good value for what they are learning.”

However, she added Aberdeenshire Council was not doing enough to promote the success of the programme and called on the authority’s communications team to market the link with Gilcomston.

She described the city school as a “centre for excellence in the north-east”.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]