Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Aberdeen community terrorised by gang of gulls

Councillor Martin Greig has appealed to the community around Viewfield not to feed the seagulls in the area as they are a problem to the area.    
Picture by Kami Thomson    25-05-18
Councillor Martin Greig has appealed to the community around Viewfield not to feed the seagulls in the area as they are a problem to the area. Picture by Kami Thomson 25-05-18

Residents of a leafy Aberdeen community claim they are being terrorised by a gang of gulls.

Homeowners say there is a “constant” problem with about 15 to 20 “permanent” seabirds setting up home in the Seafield Crescent and Viewfield Avenue areas.

They have complained of the noisy birds swooping on people to attack them and causing a “constant racket” in the early hours of the morning.

But city council staff are unable to do much to help people living on the affected streets.

The local authority website states that environmental health officers have “no statutory duties or powers to take action against gulls”.

Only the owner or occupier of a property can take measures to help prevent the large seabirds nesting on buildings.

Some of the residents have been forced to install their own measures to deter the feathered pests.

And calls have been made for anyone who is feeding the birds in the area to stop giving them food.

William Sell, the vice chairman and secretary of Craigiebuckler and Seafield Community Council, said his neighbour had even installed a bird of prey ornament in a bid to scare the gulls away.

He said: “I have seen the gulls wheeling round and round which is a sure sign someone is feeding them.

“To my mind this is doing the birds no good and is actually a reckless action.

“But the problem is it is almost impossible to prove.

“One of my neighbours has put in an artificial hawk.

“Like dog fouling people have to be caught in the act and that is very hard.”

And Hazlehead, Queens Cross and Countesswells councillor Martin Greig said it was disappointing that people living on the streets were forced into taking action themselves.

He said: “Seagulls are wild animals and every effort should be made to stop them turning into urban scavengers.

“They should be on the coast living off of natural food sources.

“Feeding seagulls is a completely misguided behaviour that causes harm to the animals and brings misery to residents.

“The animals quickly get into habits of eating and nesting so they should not be attracted into settled communities by making food available to them. The securing of bins is a crucial part of keeping seagulls away.

“It is unacceptable that residents have been forced to go to the expense of installing anti-seagull devices as protection.

“It is well known that the birds can be aggressive. It is appalling to think that they can cause considerable alarm and injury.”

One angry Viewfield resident, who did not want to be named, said: “This has been a long running issue.

“First thing in the morning the noise is just terrible. We have put spikes up on the house but they seem to nest around the block of flats.

“I think they might be attracted by people feeding the birds at Johnston Gardens.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]