Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

New figures show fishermen six times more likely to die at work

The Nancy Glen fishing trawler after its recovery from Loch Fyne at Tarbert, where it sank in January 2018
The Nancy Glen fishing trawler after its recovery from Loch Fyne at Tarbert, where it sank in January 2018

New figures have revealed that fishermen face a risk of death six times higher than the most dangerous jobs on land, confirming the profession as the UK’s “most fatal”.

A report published by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency yesterday outlined findings that, in 2017/18, the industry suffered a rate of 62 fatalities per 100,000 workers.

The second most dangerous occupation, waste and recycling, had a rate of just 10.26 per 100,000 people.

The figures have emerged in the aftermath of a spate of accidents which have claimed the life of fishermen around the north and north-east in recent months.

Last night, the Scottish Fishermen’s Federation said that a “culture change” towards embracing risk-assessment could help bring the “unacceptable” figures down.

Chief executive Bertie Armstrong said: “The centre of it is encouraging crews to embrace risk-assessment, and formalising a system where it is adhered to.

“That would require a change in culture but there is no excuse for these figures.

“We need to identify where these accidents are happening, either causing injury or death, and seriously address them.”

However, Mr Armstrong pointed out that the new figures were skewed by the relatively low levels of employment in fishing compared to some industries it was compared against.

Earlier this month, it emerged that popular West Highland fisherman Alasdair Mcleod was not wearing a life jacket or locator beacon when he fell overboard and died.

Marine accident investigators said the 57-year-old skipper’s chances of survival would have “significantly increased” had he taken such measures.

Two fishermen died when the Nancy Glen boat sank near Tarbert, Loch Fyne on January 18.

The bodies of skipper Duncan MacDougall, 46, and crewman Przemk Krawczyk, 38, were returned to their families following the complex lifting operation in April.

A criminal investigation into the circumstances of their deaths was launched in May.

The new figures have been gathered from the Marine Accident and Investigation Bureau’s 2017 annual report and the Health and Safety Executive’s yearly findings between this March and last.

Recent research by the Seafarers UK maritime welfare charity found that safety was regularly being sacrificed at ports.

It stated: “Training is perceived as a necessary evil. Less than 20% of the survey respondents don’t wear a personal flotation device on a regular basis.

“Fishermen’s tolerance and even acceptance of the risk involved in their profession would be unlikely to be tolerated in any other industry.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]