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Aberdeen pupils take part in Britain’s biggest sculpting project

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Pupils at Airyhall Primary in Aberdeen experienced world-class art in their classroom as part of the largest ever sculpture project undertaken in Britain.

Renowned Scottish sculptor Alan Herriot last week led a bespoke workshop with Primary 6 and 7 pupils, aiming to capture their imagination and inspire a lifelong passion for art.

Known locally for his Robert the Bruce sculpture outside Marischal College in Aberdeen, Mr Herriot demonstrated plaster casting first-hand and supported pupils to create their own miniature bust.

Sir Robert the Bruce statue

Two sculptures from The Gordon Highlanders Museum – a bust of Sir General Ian Hamilton and a statuette of a First World War Scottish soldier – were also showcased at the school during the morning assembly.

Mr Herriot said: ‘For many of the children, it’s a whole new set of skills they need to put in action, and it’s brilliant to see that some of them are naturally talented at working in this way – if we discover and encourage a new Rodin, then great.

“It was fantastic to see the pupils enjoying themselves when creating, as I feel that’s important to me when I work on my sculptures.”

The Masterpieces in Schools event is part of a national learning and engagement programme which launched in 2018 – part of Art UK’s ongoing sculpture project.

The initiative takes sculptures out of the museum and into classrooms, to bring children and young people into direct contact with practising artists who showcase their sculptures on site and deliver a sculpture tutorial.

Alan Herriot, Sculptor, said: ‘For many of the children, it’s a whole new set of skills they need to put in action, and it’s brilliant to see that some of them are naturally talented at working in this way – if we discover and encourage a new Rodin, then great!

“It was fantastic to see the pupils enjoying themselves when creating, as I feel that’s important to me when I work on my sculptures.’

The Masterpieces in Schools programme is being made possible thanks to grants from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation and the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

For more information about the Sculpture Project funders visit the Art UK website.

 

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