Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Aberdeenshire councillors approve £74.5 millon of flood protection schemes for funding bids

Pictured is the flooding of the River Don near Kintore/Port Elphinston/Inverurie.
Picture by DARRELL BENNS
Pictured is the flooding of the River Don near Kintore/Port Elphinston/Inverurie. Picture by DARRELL BENNS

A controversial flood scheme has been approved for Ballater – despite a roads boss admitting all the options on the table were “terrible”.

Aberdeenshire Council’s infrastructure services committee yesterday backed five multi-million-pound flood protection schemes for communities across the region, which will now be submitted to the Scottish Government in the hope of securing funding.

The proposals have been designed to protect Ellon, Insch, Inverurie and Port Elphinstone, Stonehaven and Ballater.

Fears building £31million flood protection scheme over fairways of Ballater Golf Course could cost tourism income

The latter two have proved most controversial, with concerns raised that the Stonehaven Bay Coastal Scheme, which includes building flood walls along the seafront, would harm the amenity of the seaside community, while plans to build a wall through the middle of Ballater golf course and caravan park have prompted fears over tourism.

At the meeting, roads and landscaping boss Philip McKay admitted all options for Ballater were “terrible” regarding their impact on amenity.

He said none of the choices were “particularly palatable”, said they would “significantly change the character of the village”.

However, all five options – which when combined have an estimated price tag of £74.5 million – were approved, meaning they will be submitted to the Scottish Environment Protection Agency.

The deadline for funding from Sepa is at the end of the year.

The approval came with the stipulation that all defences at sea would be “maximised in order to ensure that the sea wall height is optimised at the lowest achievable level, such that the promenade need not be raised.”

Afterwards Jim Hunter, the president of the Ballater Golf Club, said the proposals cast doubt on the future of the club.

He said: “It’s really disappointing.

“Any construction won’t happen for maybe as long as seven years, but if people are needing to renew their membership and find out that a great big wall will be built through the courses, they might not want to do that.”

Peter Argyle, the chairman of the infrastructure committee, said: “The absolute priority is protection of life and the protection of property.

“The only scheme that’s available for Ballater is this one, and I accept it’s not popular.

“It has to go through the prioritisation process with Sepa, with no guarantee of success and it may well not happen, but we need to make sure that Ballater is as far in the foremost of Sepa and the Scottish Government’s thinking as much as possible.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]