Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Fraserburgh fish bar let off for breaching planning rules to offer gluten-free batter

Findlay's Fish and Chip Shop on the corner of Commerce Street and Cross Street.
Findlay's Fish and Chip Shop on the corner of Commerce Street and Cross Street.

A Fraserburgh chip shop has been let off with breaking planning rules to install a new fryer so that it could offer up gluten free suppers.

Ian Findlay, owner of Findlay’s Fish Bar and Diner on Cross Street, failed to ask for permission from the council before dismantling a red brick chimney and installing a modern flue atop the historic listed building in the town’s conservation area.

But when he was threatened with having to undo the works, more than 70 locals stepped in with supportive letters praising the change.

The issue was referred to the council’s Banff and Buchan area committee yesterday.

Mr Findlay argued he was unaware planning permission was required, and that the building was listed.

His agent, Craig Fyvie of Baxter Design, said: “The chimney that was removed was a safety hazard.

“We would suggest luck was on our side as a fire should really have taken place by now due to poor installation by the previous installer.”

Mr Findlay said the new flue was needed for his new fryer, which means he can offer gluten free food, an offering creating three new jobs to bring his staff tally to 30.

However both Aberdeenshire Council’s built heritage team and Historic Environment Scotland said the works had a “detrimental impact” on the area.

Similarly, town councillor Charles Buchan claimed the town’s buildings were being “gradually degraded” and warned of “a long-term decline in tourism potential” should the works be allowed to remain.

However fellow councillor Brian Topping’s motion to overturn refusal of the works was backed by his counterpart Doreen Mair.

She said: “We have to weigh up the economic benefit to the town against the visual impact of this.

“This is a very successful business and, although we want to keep the integrity of the historical aspect of the town, we also need to think about the regeneration of the town as well.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]