Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

RGU launches ‘first of it’s kind’ course using photography as a tool to help people deal with loss

Neil Gibson, senior lecturer at RGU.
Neil Gibson, senior lecturer at RGU.

An Aberdeen university has launched a “world-first” course using photography to help people deal with loss.

The Robert Gordon University’s new therapeutic photography postgraduate course is the first of its kind, enabling professionals to use photography in their therapeutic practices.

In the course, images are produced to explore perceptions and relationships, as well as the interpretation of life events and societal issues.

The online programme equips those working with people who may be vulnerable or marginalised to improve their wellbeing and empower them.

Neil Gibson, a senior lecturer at RGU’s school of applied social studies, has dedicated years of research – as well as his PhD – to this practice.

In 2015, he launched a therapeutic photography programme to demonstrate to staff in the social work and care sectors how seeing life through a lens can improve their clients’ well-being.

He also worked with mental health organisation, Pillar Kincardine, to establish a therapeutic photography group for adults coping with emotional, social, or mental health challenges.

Mr Gibson travelled to Kenya to research resilience in communities by using photographs to explore issues during periods of political upheaval.

The course leader said: “This is an exciting development in the use of photography as a therapeutic tool and answers a need from professionals in various practices who work with vulnerable people and are looking for new, innovative techniques to engage and empower them.”

Photography helps individuals ‘explore the loss of a loved one to Covid’

Throughout the pandemic, Mr Gibson led a group for bereaved individuals using photography as a healing tool.

He explained: “I’ve even applied this approach with a group for bereaved individuals to help them explore the loss of a loved one to Covid.

“The use of photography in this way helped each person look at the impact loss had on their lives and identity and what they could learn from this.

“Because the group consisted of people from across the globe, they were able to share personal perspectives, but drew strength from one another in acknowledging similarities, challenges, and coping strategies. It was a cathartic experience.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]