Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Diabetes almost doubles risk of death from Covid but good management of condition can help study shows

Monitoring blood sugar levels helps to significantly increase the chances of survival for those with diabetes after contracting Covid. Supplied by Shutterstock.
Monitoring blood sugar levels helps to significantly increase the chances of survival for those with diabetes after contracting Covid. Supplied by Shutterstock.

People with diabetes are twice as likely to die from Covid but good management of the condition helps to mitigate risks, a new study has suggested.

While those struggling with diabetes are almost three times as likely to be critically ill with Covid, new research from Aberdeen University said good management of blood sugar levels can help.

The study reviewed data from 158 studies and more than 270,000 participants from all over the world.

During research with King’s College, London, is was discovered that while the risk of death and illness from Covid is higher for those with diabetes, good control of blood sugar in these patients can significantly reduce this risk.

First study of its kind

The research follows as those with diabetes were urged to get their flu jab and Covid booster after Covid was found to affect those with the condition “disproportionately”.

People with diabetes were encouraged to get Covid booster and flu jab after it was found diabetic patients were approximately three times more likely to fall critically ill or die from the coronavirus. Photo by Pasquale Gargano/Pacific Press/Shutterstock

Results gathered showed people with diabetes were 1.87 times more likely to die with Covid and 1.59 times more likely to be admitted to ICU.

However, this is the first time a study examining the risk of Covid in patients with diabetes while looking at patient’s location, available healthcare options and possible ethnic differences has been published.

The research also looked at other societal factors while gathering data from countries all over the world.

It was found that patients in China, Korea or the Middle East were at a higher risk of death than those from EU countries or the USA.

Researchers suggested this could be due to differences in healthcare systems and the affordability of healthcare. Due to this, patients would find it more difficult to monitor blood sugar levels.

Good blood sugar control increases survival rates

Stavroula Kastora from Aberdeen University who worked on the study alongside Professor Mirela Delibegovic and Professor Phyo Myint said the risks were higher for those with the condition.

The research was carried out by researchers at Aberdeen University. Supplied by University of Aberdeen.

She said: “Collective data from studies around the globe suggested that patients with diabetes had a significantly higher risk of requiring an intensive care admission and supplementary oxygen or being admitted in a critical condition in comparison to patients without diabetes.

“However, we found that the studies that reported patient data from the EU or USA displayed less extreme differences between the patient groups.

“Ultimately, we have identified a disparity in Covid outcomes between the eastern and western world.

“We also show that good glycaemic control may be a protective factor in view of Covid-19 related deaths.

“In light of the ongoing pandemic, strengthening outpatient diabetes clinics, ensuring consistent follow up of patients with diabetes and optimising their glycaemic control could significantly increase the chances of survival following a Covid infection.”

The study has been published in Endocrinology Diabetes and Metabolism. 

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]