Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Warnings put in place at Dunottar Castle to prevent drone invasion

The sign at Dunnotar Castle clearly warning against the use of drones
The sign at Dunnotar Castle clearly warning against the use of drones

Dunnottar Castle has seen off its share of invaders in the past, but now bosses at the north-east landmark have taken steps to protect it from a very modern aerial menace.

Signs have gone up at the cliff top attraction, warning that “Inappropriate flying of drones over Dunnottar Castle will be reported to the CAA (Civil Aviation Authority)”.

The move follows complaints from visitors to the 15th century ruined fortress south of Stonehaven.

Stuart Young, chief executive of Dunecht Estates, which owns the castle, insisted his team simply wanted drone enthusiasts to show some responsibility.

“Nothing has been banned,” he said.

“We have seen an increasing use of drones at Dunnottar and an increasing number of complaints from visitors about them being buzzed, effectively.

“We haven’t put up the sign to stop people’s fun. At the end of the day this is a visitor’s attraction that’s open to the public for 361 days of the year, and if that’s the feedback we get from our visitors we need to respond to that.”

A CAA spokesman said it had not received any complaints of drones flying near Dunnottar Castle. However, he added that no aircraft can be flown within 50m (164 feet) of a building, or over private land without the landowner’s permission.

The spokesman said: “As with any complaints we would look at the available evidence and make a decision on whether it merited a full investigation.

“We have prosecuted people for flying unmanned aircraft in breach of regulations. We would need evidence like video footage.”

William Bird, a drone pilot and owner of Inverurie-based professional aerial photography company Fennel Media, said there were already strict guidelines for the use of the devices – and ways to get round them – and urged Dunnottar chiefs to consider the bigger picture.

“You could just take off from someone else’s land with permission, or from sea, and you can always just film around the castle itself as it is on a peninsula, as long as you don’t get too close or directly above it,” he said.

“But I think that drones are a very powerful tool and the industry is worth millions to Britain.

“Videos and pictures of our amazing castles can really drive tourism, but instead we’re messing about worrying about whether we should fly over a castle in the middle of nowhere or not.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]