Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Fraserburgh children form links with Japanese

Chef Yuki Hamasaki shows the ingredients to Hajime Kitaoka and Jill Webster
Chef Yuki Hamasaki shows the ingredients to Hajime Kitaoka and Jill Webster

Pupils in a north-east port are being given the chance to forge new links with the adopted home of one of its most famous sons.

Japanese consul general Hajime Kitaoka visited Fraserburgh to see for himself the birthplace of “Scottish Samurai” Thomas Blake Glover.

And that inspired staff at the town’s secondary school to set up a club dedicated to exploring the culture of the Far East nation.

Glover, who was born in Fraserburgh in 1838, moved to Nagasaki when he was in his early 20s and played a crucial role in the industrialisation of Japan.

The entrepreneur helped to found the shipbuilding company which later became the Mitsubishi Corporation, and to establish the Japan Brewery Company, which later became the Kirin Brewery Company.

Mr Kitaoka visited Fraserburgh Academy last month and talked about his country’s close relationship with the town.

Now pupils be given the opportunity to discover more about Japan, learn its language, and study Glover’s amazing life.

The school’s head teacher, David Clark, said: “After a very successful visit by the consul general to Fraserburgh Academy and the subsequent enthusiasm of our young people we will be introducing Japanese classes at lunchtime for students.

“This is a great opportunity for pupils to widen their language skills and develop an international dimension to their learning.”

Last night, the Japan Society of the United Kingdom, which supported a day of Japanese-themed learning at the school during the consul’s visit, said the scheme would offer pupils the chance to see life from a different perspective.

A spokesman said: “The Japan Society was delighted to support Fraserburgh Academy’s Japan day through its small grants programme, and to hear that it has inspired so much interest within the school in learning Japanese.”

During his visit last month, Mr Kitaoka said it was his hope that the gap between Fraserburgh and Japan could be bridged in the future.

He said: “Fraserburgh is very close to Japan, but at the same time is very far from Japan.

“It’s sort of a contradiction – close because of it being the birthplace of Thomas Glover but, geographically, so remote.

“How to reconcile these contractions, that is my job, Fraserburgh is very important for Japan.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]