Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Final push to raise much-needed funds for Mearns town’s ruined church clock

Bob Jamieson has been winding the clocks every week manually for 30 years. Picture by Kevin Emslie
Picture by KEVIN EMSLIE
Bob Jamieson has been winding the clocks every week manually for 30 years. Picture by Kevin Emslie Picture by KEVIN EMSLIE

An Aberdeenshire community is making one final push for funds to restore a historic clock tower damaged during a winter storm.

One of the three faces of the timepiece at West Mearns Parish Church in Auchenblae was sent crashing to the ground by gales in January.

Others were left badly damaged and had to be removed.

The building itself dates back to the 1820s and locals say it is an important part of the Mearns village’s heritage.

Church fundraiser Jenny Thomson – who is behind the Auchenblae Church Clock Replacement Fund – said that £2,000 was still needed to complete the project.

The frames of the clocks have been fixed with money already raised, but more is needed to fund the repainting and refitting.

A total of £4,700 has been raised so far from donations, but the restoration fund target is about £7,000.

Mrs Thomson, 71, is hoping that two garden day fundraisers on August 8 and 9 will raise the money still required for the work.

She said: “It was in January when the first clock blew down and then after an inspection we decided we needed to take down the other two.

“It just blew off and landed underneath and if anyone had been standing there it would have been fatal, that is when we decided we needed to have a look at the other two.

“In years gone by local people relied on the church clock because not everyone had a watch back then.

“All the villagers really do miss the clocks. It’s just amazing how often you glance up inadvertently to check the time only to notice that they’re not there.”

She added: “It is just a part of the heritage of Auchenblae. A lot of these clocks are electronically operated nowadays but ours is still is wound by a man called Bob Jamieson.

“He has wound it for nearly 30 years. He goes up every Wednesday.

“I have to say that the public have really got behind this campaign.”

The garden days will cost £7 and locals will open their lawns to the public between 1pm-4pm on Saturday and Sunday.

People will be able to tour the gardens using a map, before returning to the village hall for strawberry teas.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]