Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Heart wrenching Deeside exhibition charting father’s battle with dementia

Hilary Nicoll is hosting an exhibition on the gallery in memory of her farther from her blog 'The Memory of Dad'
Hilary Nicoll is hosting an exhibition on the gallery in memory of her farther from her blog 'The Memory of Dad'

A north-east woman will raise awareness of the disease that robbed her father of his memory by hosting a touching exhibition.

Hilary Nicoll is launching a display of pictures at Woodend Barn in Banchory, based on her blog The Museum of Dad, which captured the change in her father Andrew as he battled dementia.

The 50-year-old first set up the blog to chart her father’s journey through memory loss.

She said: “I set up the blog after becoming fascinated with this room that my Dad was spending a lot of time in, so I started taking photographs back in 2012.

“And as the room continued to gather objects, it became a little unusual and I was quite fascinated by it.

“I felt as if, when I went into the room, I was almost entering his mind and seeing him more clearly through the objects he had surrounded himself with.

“And as his Alzheimer’s progressed I could see the room becoming a reflection of him.”

The room was originally photographed in 2012 showing piles of objects, papers, artefacts and artworks which Mr Nicoll had surrounded himself with as the dementia took hold.

Mr Nicoll was an architect in London in the 1960s for some of the prominent companies of the time, and objects and memorabilia from those days will be on show in the exhibition, alongside photographs and writing from the blog.

Mr Nicoll was also a lover of jazz music which features prominently in the display.

Ms Nicoll said: “Doing this art work has helped me process this illness and I think people seeing the display will be able to connect with the story, and there is some humour in it – there are some funny anecdotes about aspects of his memories.

“This display is very personal to me and I’ve taken a leap showing people this.

“But I think there are universal things there which will resonate with people and it has helped me come to terms with my dad’s illness.”

Ashley Lawrie, from Woodend Barn said: “The subject of The Museum of Memory is very relatable for people who have had a loved one go through this disease.

“But it also has a positive spin of celebrating the memory of who he was at the time and [spells out] that the disease is only a part of who he is now.”

The exhibition opens tomorrow and runs until June 8. The gallery at the barn is open from noon-4pm Tuesday to Saturday.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]