Aberdeenshire pre-school worker issued with warning after pulling child by leg and giving yoghurt to another with dairy allergy

Yoghurt
Yoghurt

An Aberdeenshire pre-school worker has been issued with a warning after he pulled a child by the leg and gave another with a dairy allergy a yoghurt.

Nathan Watt also shouted at his colleagues in front of children at the pre-school.

The Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) has ruled Mr Watt’s behaviour put children at “increased risk of harm” and put a two-year warning on his registration.

The tribunal heard that Mr Watt used an “inappropriate moving and handling technique” and pulled a child by the leg in 2017.

And “during a heated verbal exchange,” he was noted to have shouted at a colleague in the presence of children.

The SSSC also investigated Mr Watt’s behaviour from 2018.

They wrote in their decision report: “You did fail to check the temperature of soup you were preparing for a child.

“When challenged by a colleague as to whether you had checked the temperature of the soup, you did confirm that you had done so and had recorded the temperature, when this was not true.”

Furthermore, the same year he gave a child a yogurt, when he was “aware” that the child had a dairy allergy.

The SSSC wrote: “Pulling a child by the leg is inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour and placed the child at risk of physical harm.

“Engaging in a heated exchange with a colleague in the presence of children is unprofessional conduct and could have caused children alarm, distress and upset.

“Lying to your colleague about whether you had checked the temperature of the soup is serious and concerning behaviour, which falls far short of the standards of conduct expected of a registered worker.

“Giving the child a yogurt in your role as the responsible person, when you were aware they had a dairy allergy, breached your employer’s food allergy policy and placed the child at an increased risk of harm.”

However they noted his dishonesty was not “prolonged”, though suggested he should take steps to improve his decision-making when he feels “flustered or under pressure”.

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