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Teenager who scaled church makes court appearance

Marischal College and Greyfriars Church, Aberdeen
Marischal College and Greyfriars Church, Aberdeen

A teenager who sparked a major police operation after spending more than seven hours on the roof of a city centre church has appeared in court.

Amy Low caused Broad Street to be cordoned-off after she was spotting clinging from the top of Greyfriars Church in Aberdeen’s Queen Street on the morning of July 21.

Emergency units, including those from the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, were tied up at the scene until the early evening, when Low was taken into custody.

The 19-year-old appeared at the city’s sheriff court yesterday and pled guilty to a string of charges.

She admitted climbing onto the roof of the Queen Street building, shouting and swearing at members of the public and police and committing a breach of the peace.

Low also pled guilty to pretending to Scottish Ambulance Workers that she was unconscious on South College Street on June 25.

She further admitted another breach of the peace, threatening to jump from the first floor of a building on Crown Street if police officers did not return her mobile phone, on June 29.

And the teenager admitted assaulting a police officer on the same day by kicking him on the head.

Sheriff Sukhwinder Gill deferred sentence on Low, of Crown Street in Aberdeen, until next month and ordered the preparation of a criminal justice social work report.

Defence agent Stuart Murray entered the guilty pleas on her behalf but reserved mitigation for the next calling of the case.

Police were called to the busy street on Sunday July 21 at around 10.30am and did not leave the scene until around 6pm.

The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service were also called to the scene to assist police.

Speaking at the time, one onlooker said: “It’s pretty unusual to see such a big commotion in the middle of the city centre.

“It seemed to be causing a fair bit of disruption, with folk having to take alternative routes.”

The church, which was built in 1903, has lain empty since 2011 when the Church of Scotland decided to merge its congregations with that of Queen Street Church.

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