Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Pupils use Lego, Minecraft and poetry to plan out a green future for north-east

Primary One at St Andrews School in Fraserburgh with their winning project entry, which they worked on with teacher Mrs Hutcheson.

Children’s visions of how they want north-east communities to be handling climate change by 2030 will go on show at COP26.

The North East Scotland Climate Action Network (Nescan) challenged primary and secondary pupils across Aberdeenshire and Aberdeen to get creative and imagine what their communities will need to look like in the push for net zero in Scotland.

Using poetry and painting, and even Lego and Minecraft, the younger generation put their heads together and created a huge variety of different ideas.

Nine winning entries, alongside some other impressive productions, will be taken by Aberdeen Climate Action to go on show at COP26.

‘It was amazing to see the sheer variety of the entries’

The competition was organised alongside the Aberdeen Science Centre and Aberdeen Climate Action (ACA), and was designed to get youngsters thinking about how they can play a part in the fight against climate change.

Vanessa from Primary Seven at St Andrews Primary School in Fraserburgh designed this winning entry, showing her community with all sorts of green additions like bike lanes and solar panels.

Alison Stuart, director at ACA, said the prospect of their projects going on show at COP26 really captured the imagination of children in schools across the north-east.

A poster by Alex and Jamie from Primary Seven at Drumoak School, showing their plans for the green future of Drumoak

She said: “Us taking their ideas to COP26 really enthused them.

“It was an opportunity for kids to tell us what they want our future to look like.

James from Primary Six at Drumoak School, made a poster of his local community and what he’d like it to look like in 2030 in order to help combat climate change. His plans include an increase in plants, so that bees can pollinate.

“They were asked to create any sort of artistic impression of what they want their communities to look like by 2030.

“So we had poems, videos, Lego creations, models, plays, drawings, Minecraft videos, it was amazing to see the sheer variety of all the entries.

A poem by Ollie and Lewis from P5L at Bervie School.

“But we’re taking more than just the winners with us to COP26, we’ll have some of the pictures submitted that really show the point these children are making on display as well.

Primary One from St Andrews Primary School in Fraserburgh and their project they worked on alongside teacher Mrs Hutcheson.

“It was really, really cool, it was just so inspiring to look through all of the entries, it was actually really hard to choose the winners.”

 

 

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]