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Pictures show how the new dualled A9 will look as it crosses the River Spey

An artists impression of the new River Spey crossing
An artists impression of the new River Spey crossing

This is the first look at how the dualled A9 will cross the River Spey.

The crossing near Kingussie is one of the key points of the new road – raising a number of ecological issues as it spans the river and its extensive flood plain.

Transport Scotland will lay its plans for the bridge and the preferred option for dualling the A9 between Kincraig and Crubenmore before the public later today.

The plans reveal that crossing the Spey will involve completely removing the existing crossing and embankment.

It will be replaced with a new low-level dual carriageway bridge to the east, further away from Kingussie than the existing structure.

Scottish Government cabinet secretary for the economy, jobs and fair work Keith Brown said the crossing had been carefully designed to minimise impact on the Spey – and to avoid spoiling the view of landmarks such as the nearby Ruthven Barracks and Insh Marshes.

Mr Brown said: “The work to dual the A9 between Perth and Inverness continues apace and last week we started the procurement for the construction of the next section to be dualled between Luncarty and the Pass of Birnam, with the section between Kincraig and Dalraddy due to be completed this summer.

“The public exhibitions this week are for the challenging 16.5km (10 mile) section between Crubenmore and Kincraig which includes the River Spey and Insh Marshes, both internationally important in terms of their protected environmental status.

An artists impression of the new River Spey crossing
An artists impression of the new River Spey crossing
An artists impression of the new River Spey crossing
An artists impression of the new River Spey crossing

“The River Spey is a special area of conservation supporting important populations of Atlantic salmon, sea lamprey, fresh water pearl mussels and otter.

“In developing the crossing we are considering factors such as the local environment, proximity to Ruthven Barracks and its location within the flood plain.

“The form of the new bridge will be developed to sit low in the landscape, limit impact on the Spey, fit well within the local environment and allow unspoilt views of the Insh Marshes and nearby Ruthven Barracks.

“The preferred option for the bridge will be developed at the next stage taking account of the sensitive environment it will pass through including the river Spey and its flood plain and the Insh Marshes National Nature Reserve.”

A public exhibition will be held at Newtonmore Village Hall between noon and 8pm today.

A further event will be held at Talla nan Ros in Kingussie between 11am and 7pm tomorrow.

Mr Brown added: “We want to hear from locals and road users so I would encourage them to visit the exhibitions or view the material online and comment on our proposals.”

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