Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Battlefield where ‘Great Montrose’ fought for sale

The site is where, in 1650, James Graham, the 1st Marquis of Montrose, fought his last battle in support of the Royalist cause.
The site is where, in 1650, James Graham, the 1st Marquis of Montrose, fought his last battle in support of the Royalist cause.

A historic battlefield where one of Scotland’s greatest military commanders suffered his final defeat has gone up for sale.

Carbisdale battlefield, near Bonar Bridge in Sutherland, is on the market for offers over £70,000.

It is the site where James Graham, the 1st Marquis of Montrose, fought his last battle in support of the Royalist cause in 1650.

The 17th century military commander, poet and patriotic Scot, who became known as the Great Montrose, had led his outnumbered army to six successive victories against the Covenanters in the space of a year.

His tactical know-how, leadership and sheer daring helped him to consistently beat the odds, and 300 years on his quote to “win or lose it all” was used to inspire the troops on the eve of D-Day.

However, on April 27, 1650, his small force was defeated at the Battle of Carbisdale.

The battle was a decisive victory for the Covenanter forces against Montrose, with his forces routed almost without firing a shot.

Montrose himself escaped the field but he was handed over to the Covenanters a few days later and taken to Edinburgh to hear his sentence, then hung, drawn and quartered in the weeks after.

Now the battlefield has gone up for sale – offering potential buyers 53-acres of heather moor, pine woodland and open burns and views of of Sutherland.

Estate agents Bell Ingram say almost half of it is designated as native woodland, but a spot could be found at the site to build a family home, subject to planning approval.

The nearest railway station is a 10 minute walk, while the nearest pub is a 25-minute walk or 10 minute cycle ride away.

Joanne Stennett, from Bell Ingram, said: “This is a unique opportunity to own your piece of Scottish history in the form of Carbisdale Battlefield.

“Almost half the ground is designated as Native Woodland by the Forestry Commission Scotland, and there is an opportunity to improve and extend the native species across the whole area to create a significant block of eco-friendly land.

“Alternatively, a mix of amenity and commercial woodland is also possible, with the benefit of current government funding for tree planting.

“No application has yet been made for a dwelling house, but a site could be found, subject to necessary planning consents, for the sensitive development of a family house in keeping with the beautiful surroundings.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]