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Reason for why unique Cairngorms sculpture trail is slowly losing its works of art explained

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A unique Cairngorms sculpture trail is slowly losing its works of art – just as the artist intended.

The Frank Bruce Sculpture Trail hosts an impressive collection of work in timber and stone in the “archetypal abstraction” style developed by self-taught Aviemore-based sculptor Frank Bruce.

The striking carvings explore Scottish culture and the relationship with others, and Mr Bruce designed some to weaken and fail and others to stand the test of time.

Maree Morrison, recreation ranger with the Forestry and Land Scotland team in Glenmore, said: “The sculptures, many of them created from Scots pine from here in Inshriach forest, fill the woodland with spirits and stories. It’s quite poignant that some of the smaller pieces have already rotted away. It really gives you pause for thought when you’re walking round the trail.

“Since Frank died, there has been an effort to preserve the sculptures but long-term exposure to the elements has resulted in a couple of the really large timber suffering internal rot that has made them potentially dangerous.

“We’ve lowered those sculptures to the ground now but we have made sure that they are facing ‘up’ so that visitors can still enjoy them.

“Hopefully, our actions – which are entirely about public safety – will feed in to visitors’ interpretation and understanding of Frank’s vision.”

The presence of three stone sculptures ensures some permanent presence onsite and will remain as a memorial to Mr Bruce.

The River Feshie trail and the Feshie Woodland trail start from the main car park, and are wheelchair friendly.

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