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Scot becomes first person to run, swim and cycle the length of Outer Hebrides in the ‘The ‘Selkie’ challenge

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A Scottish adventurer has become the first person to run, swim and cycle the length of the Outer Hebrides.

James Armour overcame sea sickness to finish the 191-mile journey in 52 hours and 52 minutes.

He set off from Barra Head Lighthouse and finished at the Butt of Lewis lighthouse today, covering in total 20 miles of swimming, 52 miles of running and 112 miles of cycling – only stopping for food and water.

Mr Armour named his challenge The Selkie, after the mythical seal-folk that shed their seal skin to come on land as humans, and has so far raised more than £13,000 for the Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust.

In addition to swimming James Armour had to run across uninhabited islands and cycle over hilly terrain in a physically and mentally draining challenge. Picture by Selkie.

The Edinburgh-based adventurer admitted that the challenge had been far from easy, telling BBC Scotland: “There were enormous swells and my crew in a boat that was following me said at points I would disappear.

“They were huge slow waves that would pick me up and take me down and I started to feel very nauseous.

“I tried to swim backstroke but I still felt awful. Then the tide turned as well and I was being pushed east away from my destination.”

Mr Armour said it felt “unbelievable” to make history by becoming the first person to complete the route.

Conservation work that underpins the future safeguarding of marine wildlife.

The challenge is in aid of Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust, based on Mull in the Inner Hebrides. For the past 20 years, the trust has been working directly with local communities for the conservation of whales, dolphins and porpoises in the west coast waters.

The waters around the western Scotland are home to a number of native megafauna species including minke whales, basking sharks, killer whales, harbour porpoises, and bottlenose dolphins.

But with human-driver factors such as plastic pollution and net entanglement, on top of climate change, these animals are facing a huge fight for survival.

With just eight killer whales left in west coast community, Mr Armour’s wanted to raise awareness for the charity’s monitoring, educational and conservation work that underpins the future safeguarding of marine wildlife.

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