Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Shinty clubs aim to improve their game as part of new UHI Inverness study

UHI Inverness sports lecturer Jed McKernie with Lovat players
UHI Inverness sports lecturer Jed McKernie with Lovat players

Highland shinty clubs are taking part in a new study to identify the needs of players to compete at the top of their game.

UHI Inverness sports lecturer Jed McKernie is working with local teams in Beauly, Glenurquhart and Lovat to carry out a training needs analysis to inform best practice in training.

The research forms part of a new study, titled “The science of shinty: a needs analysis and training considerations”.

The project is being carried out as part of UHI’s Masters by Research in Exercise Physiology, Training and Nutrition programme and will take two years to complete.

Data from fitness tests and GPS tracking will be collected from players throughout training sessions and competitive league matches over the next six months.

Speaking about the Mr McKernie, said: “This is a fantastic way for UHI Inverness to support our shinty community, as traditionally teams have had to rely on research from other sports to inform their training.

Shinty players jostle while in competition.

“It’s going to be hugely beneficial for teams looking to improve their squads, but also players in all divisions by giving them a base upon which to compare themselves against elite players and the tools and know-how to compete at international level.

“We’ll be carrying out fitness tests, looking at things like speed, how quickly players can change direction and the general physical requirements of the sport.

“We’ll also be working with Lovat to track players using GPS technology so we can analyse pitch activity during a competitive match.”

Driving development in shinty

The project founders say the study further strengthens the relationship between UHI and the sports’ governing body, the Camanachd Association.

Last year the two organisations signed a memorandum of understanding to work together to explore opportunities around volunteering, work experience, education, and training, coaching and community awareness.

Derek Kerr, Camanachd Association chief executive, said the study will help players and their respective clubs “track their progress and drive development” moving forward.

The study is being carried out as part of UHI’s Masters by Research in Exercise Physiology, Training and Nutrition programme and will take two years to complete. Picture by Sandy McCook.

“We are delighted to once again be working in partnership with UHI,” he said.

“On this occasion the project will deliver reliable, cutting-edge data for all shinty clubs and will be a great tool to track progress and drive development within our sport.

“Furthermore, we are aware that one of our clubs, inspired by this project, has moved forward with GPS technology independent of the project.

“It is clear that the impacts of this fascinating piece of work are already being felt even before the conclusion of the project.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]