Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Record breaking increase in visitors to Urquhart Castle

Tourists visiting Urquhart Castle
Tourists visiting Urquhart Castle

One of the north’s most famous landmarks has attracted a record breaking number of visitors.

Nearly 350,000 people visited Urquhart Castle on the shores of Loch Ness in 2015.

The Association of Leading Visitor Attractions (Alva) compiled the figures, saying there had been a 5.5% increase in footfall at the attraction.

In total 348,691 people passed through the doors at Urquhart Castle, which is owned owned by Historic Scotland.

The landmark, which sits on the shores of the loch just to the south of Drumnadrochit, was one of a number of Scottish attractions which reported an increase including Edinburgh and Stirling castles, which

Euan Fraser, manager of Urquhart Castle, said: “It’s great to hear that Scottish tourism had such a good year – it was certainly a busy one for us here at Urquhart Castle.

“Lots of visitors came to see us as part of our explorer pass scheme, and we had some great events including conservation tours and costumed performers.

“This increase in footfall goes to show that Scotland’s history continues to capture people’s imaginations, and we’re hoping to share Urquhart Castle’s stories with even more visitors in 2016.”

Urquhart Castle was once one of Scotland’s largest strongholds with its commanding position in the Great Glen overlooking Loch Ness.

It is currently in a ruined state but it had a bloody history during its 500 years as a medieval fortress

The magnificently situated Urquhart Castle, on the banks of Loch Ness, remains an impressive stronghold despite its ruinous state.

Urquhart was once one of Scotland’s largest castles. Its remains include a tower house – the most recent building on the site – that commands splendid views of the famous loch and Great Glen.

Following the invasion of King Edward I of England in 1296, it fell into English hands and was then reclaimed and lost again.

In the 1300s it figured prominently in the Scots’ struggle for independence and came under the control of Robert the Bruce after he became King of Scots in 1306.

In the 1400s and 1500s, the castle and glen were frequently raided from the west by the ambitious MacDonald Lords of the Isles.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]