Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Lift off as groundbreaking rocket launch trial successful in Easter Ross

Skylark L by Skyrora completing a static launch test in Easter Ross
Skylark L by Skyrora completing a static launch test in Easter Ross

A private rocket company has successfully completed a dry run rocket launch in Easter Ross, the first of its kind in the country for half a century.

The test saw Skyrora’s Skylark-L perform all actions of a launch while not actually taking off.

Skylark-L is a launch vehicle for small satellites.

The move paves the way for the rocket to launch from a British spaceport within months, with the company’s  low earth orbital rocket, Skyrora XL  planned to follow in 2023.

Skyrora built a mobile launch complex in five days at Kildemorie Estate near Alness for the test.

It is the company’s first sub-orbital flight vehicle, able to reach a height of approximately 62 miles up to the Kármán Line, the boundary between earth’s atmosphere and outer space, with a payload of up to 60kg (132lb).

Skyrora Skylark-L ready for launch.

It is fuelled by a combination of hydrogen peroxide and kerosene, but when commercial, the company plans to use its own Ecosene, an equivalent kerosene fuel made from un-recyclable plastic waste.

The operation was carried under strict social distancing measures, said Skyrora’s chief executive officer, Volodymyr Levykin.

“We are now in a full state of readiness for launch. It is this milestone that is the start of the UK’s new space revolution, a fantastic example of the potential of what the UK space industry holds for future.”

Operation lead Dr Jack-James Marlow said: “This is the first time a launch vehicle of this magnitude has been tested in the UK for many years and I am very proud of my team for achieving this.

“The vehicle is now ready for flight and we are one step closer to putting the UK back into space.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]