Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Moray children inspired to choose engineering and science careers by RAF

Bishopmill Primary School pupil Amy Simpson learning about flight at RAF Lossiemouth.
Bishopmill Primary School pupil Amy Simpson learning about flight at RAF Lossiemouth.

Hundreds of Moray school children have sampled what life is like supporting the country’s frontline air defence.

Children from across the region have visited RAF Lossiemouth to inspire them to choose a career in engineering or science.

Personnel from the air base showcased the wide range of skills that are involved in keeping the UK’s most advanced fighter jets in the air.

More than 900 P6 and P7 pupils got to experience what it was like to fly faster than the speed of sound, put together aircraft engines and used maths to work out how to move planes on the apron.

However, the highlight for many was taking control of a powerful hose with the RAF’s finest firemen to put out real flames.

New Elgin Primary School pupil Aidan Spence, 11, said: “We’ve been learning about the fire triangle – what makes a fire and how to put it out.

“We’ve also learned that lots of machines can now be used to do work that used to be done by hand.”

The event aimed to develop the children’s skills in science, technology, engineering and maths (Stem) subjects.

As well as gaining the chance look at what is needed to join the front line, the school pupils also learned about other roles in the air force.

The young visitors had to become detectives to find fingerprints on a door in a mock-up crime scene.

Diageo, the University of Highlands and Islands and the Royal Northern Countryside Alliance showcased career options outside of the RAF.

Sarah Riley-Evans, community development officer at RAF Lossiemouth, said: “New aircraft are coming to the base and we want children to see that as a huge opportunity for them.

“There will be training opportunities as part of that for the next couple of years and into the future. We want them to see it as a platform to help build a career.”

Moray Council education officer Maxine Scott added: “Moray traditionally has a low-wage economy, so we want to show there are real good quality jobs out there.

“Working in the RAF isn’t all about flying planes – there are a lot of other skills on the base, whether it’s dentists or whatever.

“There is a lot in Moray to encourage our young people to stay here.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]