Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Motorists urged to be aware of deer on roads now nights are longer

Motorists have been warned to be vigilant of deer at the roadside in the darker nights.
Motorists have been warned to be vigilant of deer at the roadside in the darker nights.

Motorists are being urged to be vigilant for deer now the nights are drawing in.

With darkness falling earlier, deer are more likely to venture on to the grass verges near roadsides during peak commuting times as they look for food.

Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) has called on drivers to be extra cautious and has placed warning messages on electronic road signs on some of the country’s major roads.

It is estimated the number of collisions between deer and vehicles could be as high as 9,000 per year in Scotland, resulting in 50 to 100 human injuries.

The majority of collisions take place in early evening through to midnight, with another spike between 6am and 9am.

Jamie Hammond, SNH deer management officer, said: “From October to December, deer are more likely to be on the road as they move down to lower ground to find food and shelter.

“The highest risk is from sunset to midnight and shortly before and after sunrise.

“In these peak times in particular, we advise motorists to slow down and watch for deer crossing roads.

“Be aware that if you’re driving near woods, deer can suddenly appear before you have time to brake.

“If you do hit a deer, report it to the police, even if you’re uninjured and your car isn’t damaged, as the deer may be fatally injured and suffering.”

The warnings will be placed on signs on the A9 Inverness to Perth road, the A87 Invergarry to Uig road, the A82 Glasgow to Inverness road, the A85 Oban to Dundee road and the A835 Inverness to Ullapool road.

Jochen Langbein, who oversees the Deer Vehicle Collisions Project, added: “The increased risk of collisions with deer in late autumn is greatest in areas where our three largest deer species – red, sika and fallow deer – are most abundant.

“Late autumn coincides with their mating season, when they are highly mobile on the move to and from their rutting areas, and adult males will often chase blindly across roads in pursuits of females or rival males.

“In addition, the shorter day lengths brings rush hour traffic periods in line with the peak dawn and dusk activity times of all our deer species, adding further to an increase in deer collision risk.”

 

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]