Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

North and north-east road death figures are a “national disgrace”

Alex Johnstone
Alex Johnstone

The Conservatives have branded figures which showed more people were killed on north and north-east roads last year than anywhere else in Scotland a “national disgrace”

Official statistics published yesterday revealed that 33 people died in Grampian and 26 in the Highlands and islands in 2014 – an increase on the previous year figures.

There were 310 serious casualties on north-east roads – the highest rate in Scotland – and 82 in the Highlands and islands.

The figures showed that 200 people were killed on the roads across Scotland last year in comparison to 172 in 2013 – a 16% increase.

Tory transport spokesman Alex Johnstone, a north-east MSP, said: “Road users including children are still dying and being seriously injured and this is a national disgrace.

“It shows the SNP government’s flashy TV adverts on the subject, are simply not working.

“It’s time the they invested more time and effort into finding out the real cause of accidents and devised a much better plan to stop this death and destruction on our roads.”

Transport Minister Derek Mackay admitted the figures were “disappointing” and said that all road users had a responsibility to make them safer.

Transport and Islands Minister Derek Mackay
Transport Minister Derek Mackay

He added that local authorities should consider introducing more 20mph zones.

Mr Mackay said: “The longer term downward trends and the annual decline in the total number of casualties, to the lowest level since records began, are encouraging but more can, and must, be done.”

The minister said the country’s tough new drink drive limit would “undoubtedly help prevent the tragic and unnecessary loss of lives” on the roads.

He added that the average speed cameras on the A9 Inverness to Perth road were delivering benefits and significant investment was improving safety for cyclists.

Michael McDonnell, director of Road Safety Scotland, said: “Ultimately we need all road users to take ownership of their own safety and that of those with whom we share the roads daily – it’s everyone’s responsibility.”

The campaigner said his organisation had developed resources for use in schools and campaigns on driving on country roads and the influence parents have on their child’s future driving style.

Road death figures

Provisional road casualty rates for Grampian and Highlands and islands.

Aberdeen

Six people died, 87 were serious injured with a total of 310 casualties in 2014.

Four people died, 99 were seriously injured with a total of 393 casualties in 2013.

Aberdeenshire

Twenty five people died, 177 were seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 570 in 2014.

Twenty three people died, 175 were seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 623 in 2013.

Moray

Two people died, 46 were seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 121 in 2014

Three people died, 47 people were seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 155 in 2013.

Highland

Nineteen people died, 69 people were seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 580 in 2014.

Twenty one people died 73 people were seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 618 in 2013.

Orkney

Two people died, five people were seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 29 in 2014.

Two people were killed, four were seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 30 in 2013.

Shetland

One person died, two people were seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 29 in 2014.

One person died, four people were seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 47 in 2013.

Western Isles

Four people died, six were seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 47 in 2014.

One person was seriously injured and the total number of casualties was 23 in 2013.

A total of 56 pedestrians were killed on Scotland’s roads and eight cyclists and 31 motorcyclists lost their lives in 2014.

Thirty seven pedestrians, 13 cyclists and 23 motorcyclists died in 2013.

Seven children were killed and 171 seriously injured in 2014, down from nine fatalities and 143 serious injuries in 2013.

Overall there were 1,694 serious casualties on Scotland’s roads last year, up from 1,667 the year before.

There were 11,240 casualties in 2014 compared to 11,493 the previous year.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]