Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Tributes to Scottish poet who helped influence generation of younger writers

Roddy Lumsden – So Glad I’m Me (Bloodaxe) T S Eliot Prize  Nominee
Roddy Lumsden – So Glad I’m Me (Bloodaxe) T S Eliot Prize Nominee

Scottish poet Roddy Lumsden has been praised for shaping the British scene following his death at the age of 53.

Lumsden was born in St Andrews in 1966, and lived in Edinburgh for many years where he studied at the University of Edinburgh – before moving to London in 1998.

The move followed the publication of his first collection, Yeah Yeah Yeah, in 1997.

His second collection, The Book of Love, was released in 2000 and was shortlisted for the T.S. Eliot Prize.

Mischief Night: New & Selected Poems followed in 2004 and won a Poetry Book Society Recommendation.

His later collections were also shortlisted for prestigious prizes and Lumsden was hailed for playing a “significant role” in the development of his publisher Bloodaxe over the past 25 years.

Bloodaxe has paid tribute to the poet for his “mentoring, editing and promotion” of many of the younger poets the company and other publishers took on over the years.

The firm issued a statement which said that many of them would go on “to receive far greater recognition than Roddy himself”.

Lumsden earned his living as a freelance writer and editor, also specialising in quizzes and word puzzles, and represented Scotland twice on BBC Radio 4’s Round Britain Quiz.

He also held several residencies, including ones with the City of Aberdeen, St Andrews Bay Hotel, and as “poet-in-residence” to the music industry.

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]