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The Voice of the North: The party is well and truly over, prime minister

Boris Johnson chairs a cabinet meeting in May, flanked on his left by Rishi Sunak and on his right by Sajid Javid. Both have now resigned (Photo: Oli Scarff/AP/Shutterstock)
Boris Johnson chairs a cabinet meeting in May, flanked on his left by Rishi Sunak and on his right by Sajid Javid. Both have now resigned (Photo: Oli Scarff/AP/Shutterstock)

Time is up for Boris Johnson.

While the prime minister has so far been able to ignore deafening and repeated calls for his resignation from all sides, including many from within his own party, last night undoubtedly marked the dramatic opening of his last act inside 10 Downing Street.

The voice of the north comment on Boris JohnsonThe unravelling of Johnson’s premiership has made a mockery of not just the Conservatives and Westminster, but democracy as a whole.

Strong words from senior members of his Cabinet underline what has been painfully obvious for many months now: all trust in the prime minister is gone and he cannot continue his charade any longer.

Scandal upon scandal have piled up since the beginning of the Covid pandemic. During a time of unprecedented crisis, the UK needed and deserved a level-headed leader with the public’s best interests at heart.

His attempts to laugh off Covid rule-breaking turned his government into a laughing stock

Standing stoically at his podium day after day in 2020, the self-interested Johnson may have looked the part, but his actions during that time – and his efforts to conceal them – speak volumes about his true character.

His attempts to laugh off Covid rule-breaking turned his government into a laughing stock. And no one is laughing now.

Johnson has willingly extended his fall from grace

First to step down yesterday was former health minister Sajid Javid, writing in his resignation letter British people “rightly expect integrity from their government”, something Boris Johnson is severely lacking. Following close behind, former chancellor Rishi Sunak wrote government should be “conducted properly, competently and seriously”, calling urgently for honesty.

While both men praised the prime minister’s past achievements, they made it clear that all Johnson has succeeded in doing lately is alienating loyal supporters.

Rather than bowing out, he has willingly extended his fall from grace, cementing his pathetic legacy. But, whether you like it or not, prime minister, the party is well and truly over now.


The Voice of the North is The Press & Journal’s editorial stance on what we think is the most important story of the day

Comment: Follow us on Twitter for all of the latest opinion and comment from The Press and Journal editorial team and guest columnist.

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