Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Our Aberdeen: Star of Tasmania heads home

Figurehead from the Aberdeen sailing ship Star of Tasmania
Figurehead from the Aberdeen sailing ship Star of Tasmania

This pine sculpture of a woman in a blue dress with a garland of flowers in her hair is the figurehead from a ship named the Star of Tasmania.

Figureheads adorned and decorated the bows of ships through history. Sadly, she is missing an arm, lost during her fascinating story.

The Star of Tasmania was a clipper built here in Aberdeen by Alexander Hall & Co in 1856 for a Captain Tulloch, who was engaged in the Australian and New Zealand wool trade.

 width=

The ship and figurehead would have made this trip many times during its 12-year career. The journey typically took two to three months for the average clipper to complete.

Most ships would only make the round trip three or four times a year, carrying goods and passengers both ways. The Star of Tasmania was considered one of the swiftest clippers of its time, with a recorded 74-day run from London to King’s Island, Tasmania.

The ship’s career came to a tragic end in the evening of February 3 1868.

 width=
Aberdeen Maritime Museum

Together with several other ships anchored off the Oamaru coast of New Zealand’s South Island, it was caught in a storm, was pushed shore and wrecked as it hit the ground, killing two sailors, David Petrie and William Brooks, and two passengers, the young sons of a Mrs Baker. The remaining crew and passengers were rescued due to the heroic efforts and quick thinking of a sailor named Duncan Young.

The figurehead was recovered by the Oamaru harbourmaster Captain Sewell. It was found again in the 1950s in a farm hedgerow, where it was being used to block a hole.

She changed hands several times before being bought from Sotheby’s by Aberdeen City in 2003. She is now on display in the Aberdeen Maritime Museum as a storied example of the city’s rich shipbuilding history and global connections.

Enjoy a virtual voyage of discovery – explore Aberdeen Maritime Museum from the comfort and safety of your own home using the Smartify app. Download it for free from the App Store or Google Play or visit www.smartify.org/tour/discover-aberdeen-maritime-museum-tour

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]

This article originally appeared on the Evening Express website. For more information, read about our new combined website.

More from the Press and Journal Past Times team

More from the Press and Journal