Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Coronavirus: Woodside records highest death rate from Covid-19 across north and north-east

Woodside has seen the highest death rate across the north and north-east, according to new figures released by the National Records of Scotland.
Woodside has seen the highest death rate across the north and north-east, according to new figures released by the National Records of Scotland.

New figures have revealed Woodside in Aberdeen has the highest death rate across the north and north-east from Covid-19 and falls within the top 20 highest death rates in Scotland.

The National Records of Scotland (NRS) has for the first time provided a more detailed geographical breakdown, which reveals that Woodside has seen the highest number of coronavirus fatalities per head of population in the area, followed by the Peterhead Harbour area in Aberdeenshire and Skye North East.

It comes as new figures reveal that, as of June 14, a total of 4,070 coronavirus deaths were recorded across Scotland, with 70 recorded since June 7, the seventh weekly drop in a row and lowest weekly total since late March.

The breakdown reveals that 17 people have lost their lives to the virus in Woodside, in a population of 3,989 people – the 17th highest death rate in the country.

The community was previously named as the most deprived area in Aberdeen, according to figures released by the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) in January and ranked 313th most deprived area in Scotland.

A total of 22 people have died as a result of Covid-19 in the Peterhead Harbour region, from a population of 6,432, and 10 people in a population of 3,445 in Skye North East.

North-east Labour MSP Lewis Macdonald.

North-east Labour MSP Lewis Macdonald said the Covid-19 crisis has highlighted inequality in health and how some communities are “more vulnerable than another”.

He added: “What I hope the outcome of that will be is government and all parties work with renewed effort to address health inequality and to bring health care into these communities who need it most and where the vulnerability of these communities is being shown up so starkly.”

According to the report released by NRS on Wednesday, people in the most deprived areas were 2.1 times more likely to die with Covid-19.

 

North-east Conservative MSP, Tom Mason.

Scottish Conservative north-east MSP Tom Mason said it was “frightening” to see Woodside among the places which have had the most deaths from Covid-19.

He added: “My sympathies go to everyone in these areas who has been affected by these tragic events.

“Serious attention must be given by the Scottish Government to places such as Woodside to ensure residents have access to protection and feel they have the adequate level of care available – it’s vital this is done.”

Figures were also released for the first time on Covid-19 deaths by occupation, which showed that the highest number of deaths occurred among “process, plant and machine operatives”.

A total of 43 deaths were recorded among this occupation, while health care workers had a lower death rate (5.9 per 100,000 population) compared to the average death rate for all occupations.

Data released on Wednesday on NHS Scotland’s new Test and Protect system showed 992 cases were reported where an individual tested positive for Covid-19 between the day the system launched on May 28 and June 14. 

Contract tracing has been completed for 891 cases and will be “ongoing” in others”, the First Minister confirmed, with 1,239 contacts traced so far – at a rate of 1.4 people contact traced per person on average.

The latest figures released by NRS show deaths involving Covid-19 account for 7% of all deaths, which has steadily reduced from a high of 36% in the week of April 20 and from 8% in the week of June 7.

The number of deaths has fallen for the seventh week in a row, with 70 deaths the lowest weekly total recorded since late March.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon speaking during First Minister’s Questions on Thursday.

Speaking during First Minister’s Questions on Wednesday, Nicola Sturgeon said the figures were “higher than I would ever wish them to be”.

She added: “I do know downward trends will never console those who have lost loved ones.

“The weekly number has now fallen for the seventh week in a row and they are now at less than a ninth of its peak level.”

She added that as a result of the figures, she expects to confirm on Thursday that Scotland can move into phase two of the Scottish Government’s roadmap out of lockdown.

She said: “We will continue to proceed in a cautious and phased way because the more we hammer down this virus now, the more normality we can ultimately get back in all aspects of our lives.”

Meanwhile, half (50%) of all registered deaths involving Covid-19 in the week of June 14 occurred in care homes, down from a peak of 60% in the week of May 3, but the majority of deaths still take place in these settings.

The number of deaths in care homes fell for a sixth week, by seven to 35.

A total of 373 people in the north and north-east have died after contracting Covid-19, since the pandemic began – with an increase of six in the past week in Grampian.

No new deaths linked to Covid-19 recorded in Highlands and islands in past week, new figures show

 

 

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]