Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Jim Murphy wants income tax powers

Scottish Labour leadership candidate Jim Murphy
Scottish Labour leadership candidate Jim Murphy

The MP bidding to become the new Scottish Labour leader will today back full devolution of income tax despite warnings it will pave the way for Britain’s break-up.

Jim Murphy will say the move would be as significant as Tony Blair’s rewriting of the party’s “clause four” commitment to nationalisation at the dawn of New Labour.

His call for agreement to devolve all income tax cash to Holyrood will be made in the face of warnings of dire consequences from former prime minister Gordon Brown.

Mr Brown suggested it could prevent Scottish MPs from voting on Westminster’s Budget, creating two classes of representative, and mean “the Union is all but over”.

Mr Murphy’s leadership rival Neil Findlay MSP has expressed sympathy with calls for full devolution of income tax powers, however the other prospective leader Sarah Boyack MSP has spoken of her “reservations”.

The cross-party Smith Commission on further devolution is expected to deliver its interim report on Thursday.

Speaking in Glasgow today, East Renfrewshire MP Mr Murphy will outline his fiscal policy.

He will say: “Even before the Smith Commission reports, we should agree to the full devolution of income tax to Scotland, if that is what emerges.

“This is a significant moment for Scottish Labour.

“It is as important a change for the Scottish Labour Party as the rewriting of Clause Four was for the UK Labour Party.

“We will not only meet our promise on more powers for Scotland, we will exceed it. It is a clear signal to Scotland that we have changed, that we get it, that we will stand up for Scotland.

“On this central issue, we have listened to the people of Scotland and it is clearly an outcome that commands their support.

“This is also a big moment in the history of our parliament. It will create the clear connection between the raising of taxes and the spending of revenues which is missing at present.”

Meanwhile, Scottish Liberal Democrat leader Willie Rennie defended the Smith Commission’s quick timetable while giving evidence to MPs yesterday.

Speaking to Westminster’s political and constitutional reform committee, he said: “If you give people three years then they will take three years. If you give them two months they will take two months. I think there’s absolutely plenty of time.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]

More from the Press and Journal Scottish politics team

More from the Press and Journal