Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

Labour MP argues undecided voters are switching to No

Margaret Curran
Margaret Curran

The Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland yesterday argued undecided voters are switching to the No side as September’s independence referendum draws near.

Labour’s Margaret Curran said on a visit to Aberdeen that she believed the Better Together campaign was winning the economic argument with its “best of both worlds” message.

The Glasgow East MP held an informal event in the city on Wednesday evening targeting female voters who had not yet made up their minds, before hitting doorsteps in Torry and talking to members of the public in the city centre.

She said: “It is very clear to me that the No vote is gaining ground.

“We have been pretty focused on undecided voters here, and when you talk to people about some of the issues we are facing, the factors that will determine their view, it is clear the SNP can’t answer their questions.

“These are basic questions about the economy that Alex Salmond can’t answer, on interest rates, on currency.

“I think our message, that people can have the best of both worlds, is really working.”

Mrs Curran said the biggest issue for voters that she spoke to in Aberdeen was the economy, while many people were interested in enhanced devolution for Scotland.

With less than 50 days now to go until voters go to the polls, the Labour politician said there would be “no complacency” from the Better Together campaign.

She added: “We are getting nearer the finish mark, but there is still a long, long way to go.”

Scottish Finance Secretary John Swinney was in Kelso yesterday, meanwhile, arguing that a Yes vote in September would help companies “improve their reach” on the world stage.

On a visit to locally-based Scotmas Group, which specialises in the design of water treatment dosing systems, Mr Swinney highlighted Scotland’s export potential.

He said: “The success of Scotmas reflects Scotland’s annual growth in manufactured exports – the fastest seen since 2008.

“This comes in the same week that we see coverage of new analysis showing Scotland’s GDP per head is significantly better than major economies like France, Japan and the UK as a whole.

“With a Yes vote and the full powers of independence we would be able to use the full range of economic levers at our disposal to enable Scottish companies to increase their global reach.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]

More from the Press and Journal UK politics team

More from the Press and Journal