Calendar An icon of a desk calendar. Cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across. Caret An icon of a block arrow pointing to the right. Email An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of the Facebook "f" mark. Google An icon of the Google "G" mark. Linked In An icon of the Linked In "in" mark. Logout An icon representing logout. Profile An icon that resembles human head and shoulders. Telephone An icon of a traditional telephone receiver. Tick An icon of a tick mark. Is Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes. Is Not Public An icon of a human eye and eyelashes with a diagonal line through it. Pause Icon A two-lined pause icon for stopping interactions. Quote Mark A opening quote mark. Quote Mark A closing quote mark. Arrow An icon of an arrow. Folder An icon of a paper folder. Breaking An icon of an exclamation mark on a circular background. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Caret An icon of a caret arrow. Clock An icon of a clock face. Close An icon of the an X shape. Close Icon An icon used to represent where to interact to collapse or dismiss a component Comment An icon of a speech bubble. Comments An icon of a speech bubble, denoting user comments. Ellipsis An icon of 3 horizontal dots. Envelope An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of a facebook f logo. Camera An icon of a digital camera. Home An icon of a house. Instagram An icon of the Instagram logo. LinkedIn An icon of the LinkedIn logo. Magnifying Glass An icon of a magnifying glass. Search Icon A magnifying glass icon that is used to represent the function of searching. Menu An icon of 3 horizontal lines. Hamburger Menu Icon An icon used to represent a collapsed menu. Next An icon of an arrow pointing to the right. Notice An explanation mark centred inside a circle. Previous An icon of an arrow pointing to the left. Rating An icon of a star. Tag An icon of a tag. Twitter An icon of the Twitter logo. Video Camera An icon of a video camera shape. Speech Bubble Icon A icon displaying a speech bubble WhatsApp An icon of the WhatsApp logo. Information An icon of an information logo. Plus A mathematical 'plus' symbol. Duration An icon indicating Time. Success Tick An icon of a green tick. Success Tick Timeout An icon of a greyed out success tick. Loading Spinner An icon of a loading spinner.

World’s first tidal turbine testing centre opens

FastBlade’s 75-tonne reaction frame fitted with a tidal turbine blade. Credit: Lesley Martin
FastBlade’s 75-tonne reaction frame fitted with a tidal turbine blade. Credit: Lesley Martin

The world’s first testing facility for tidal turbine blades has opened in Scotland.

Based in Rosyth, Fife, the £4.6 million FastBlade facility will test blades made from materials which must withstand harsh weather for 20 years.

Scotland Office minister Malcolm Offord officially opened the facility on Friday.

Fastblade
Members of the FastBlade team at the opening event for the facility in Rosyth, Fife (Lesley Martin/PA)

He said: “The UK Government is delighted to support this rapid test facility with £1.8 million from EPSRC (Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council), as part of UK Research and Innovation.

“Crucially, it will speed up the rollout of equipment that will capitalise on sustainable tidal power and underline Scotland’s place as a world leader in offshore renewables technology.

“This test site, born from innovative research at the University of Edinburgh and engineering firm Babcock, will not only aid the UK’s net-zero ambitions, it will support thousands of skilled energy sector jobs as we transition to a more sustainable future.”

Blades of up to 50 metres long will be stress-tested by a 75-tonne reaction frame, carried out by powerful hydraulic cylinders. They will replicate the harsh conditions turbines withstand at sea.

Professor Conchur O Bradaigh, head of the school of engineering at the University of Edinburgh, said: “FastBlade will be the world’s first dedicated fatigue test facility for tidal turbine blades, and will help this emerging industry provide clean, reliable renewable energy at a reasonable cost to consumers.

“The facility will also help maintain the globally leading position of Scottish tidal turbine developers in the race to find sources of clean and secure power, as well as confirming the societal impact of the University of Edinburgh’s research and development efforts in marine renewable energy.”

Already a subscriber? Sign in

[[title]]

[[text]]